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The owner of this page is DinosaursRoar. According to policy, no other user, with the exception of admins, may edit this page without the owner's permission. If they do, they will receive an automatic 3 month block.

The Future Is Wild is a 2020 documentary television series. Based on research and interviews with several scientists, the series shows how life could evolve in the future if humans were to disappear from the Earth altogether through extinction. The version broadcast on the Discovery Channel modified this premise, supposing instead that the human species had completely abandoned the Earth and had sent back probes to examine the progress of life on the planet as time progressed. The show took the form of a nature documentary. It is a reboot of The Future Is Wild from 2002.

Each episode is 1 hour long.

Ecosystems

270 ecosystems were presented, 30 in each of nine future periods. The Arctic, North & South America, Europe, Asia, Australia, Africa, Russia (which is now a continent), Antarctica, and a new continent named Teria (replacing Hawaii) appear.

5 million years' time

About 5 million years hence, the world is in the grip of an ice age. Most of the world's freshwater is locked up in the ice caps and glaciers. The animals who live on the borders of the ice have to adapt to the harsh temperatures and unforgiving winters. The tropical rainforests of this future earth have mostly been replaced by tracts of savanna and grassland, devastating such diverse ecosystems as the Amazon basin. The Mediterranean has dried up as Africa moves slowly north towards Europe, which is mostly covered in ice and tundra. The East African Rift has split off from the mainland to form its own landmass just as Madagascar did eighty five millions of years prior to it. Australia has moved north and collided with New Guinea and parts of Indonesia, pushing them northwestwards and causing them to fuse into Southeast Asia. Underwater volcanos erupt and turn Hawaii into a continent the size of Australia.

Florida Rainforest

The Florida rainforest is the last rainforest left on earth, having from gigantic butterflies, to monster wolves, it used to be the state of Florida. The Florida rainforest is now home to the last pythons in Florida, and one of the last dylanus species in North America, the Megadylanus. The Florida rainforest was formed by flower trees and other native plants that became like the former Amazon rainforest. It is not technically a rainforest, but it is a mixture of a rainforest, a swamp, and a temperate forest.

Hypothesized Species
  • Megadylanus, one of the last species of dylanus in North America (along with the American common dylanus), descended from a group of American common dylanuses, lives in the Florida Rainforests. Its main predators are big cats (old and new), bears, wolves, crocodiles, Unlike its ancestors, it is completely herbivorous. It is the largest species of dylanus in the future, even bigger than the Indian Giant Dylanus.
  • Sword-toothed Cat (Gladiodon populator), descended from a resurrected species of Smilodon, adapting sword-shaped fangs to easily kill prey. It competes with predators, old and new.
  • Gigabutterfly, a giant butterfly about the size of a car (due to higher oxygen levels than today), lives in the Florida Rainforests.
  • Flesh-ripper (Canis lupus monstrum), a species of wolf in the Florida Rainforest. It can tear apart flesh of animals, hence its name. It resembles a prehistoric dire wolf in appearance and size. Like its ancestors, it mainly communicates by howling. Their ancestors probably migrated to Florida after humans introduced the wolf's main prey item, elk, were brought to Florida, and after people went to space, grey wolves migrated to Florida to hunt Florida's elk. They are the smartest and strongest wolf species to ever exist.
  • Florida Elk, descended from elk that were introduced to Florida by humans. They are similar to their ancestors, but are now better evolved to swim.
  • Florida Swamp Deer, despite its name, it is not descended from swamp deer that were brought to North America by humans, but is descnded from whitetail deer that is better evolved for swimming.
  • Florida Macaque, descended from introduced rhesus macaques that became native species of Florida. They might have been responsible for the extinction of most native dylanus species, including the Florida Running Dylanus.
  • Florida Alligator, descended from American alligators that grew larger, about the size of a saltwater crocodile, making it the largest alligator on earth and the largest crocodillian species. They are now the top reptile predators once again after most of the invasive Burmese python was killed off in Florida due to climate change and competition from native alligators, allowing alligators to regain their former glory.
  • Florida Hippopotamus, descended from African hippopotamuses that escaped from zoos. They are similar to their ancestors, but are far less aggressive as there are less predators in Florida than in Africa.
  • Rainforest Mammoth, descended from a herd of Woolly Mammoth that adapted to live in the rainforest. Its main predators are big cats, bears, wolves, and other native predators.
  • Swamp Deathgleaner, a species of deathgleaner-grouped daytime predatory bat that lives in Florida.
  • Florida Rattleback, a close relative of Kansas' desert rattleback that lives in Florida.
  • Florida Capybara, descended from capybaras that were introduced into Florida between 1970's & 1990's and became an invasive species. They are similar to their ancestors.
  • Titanopython (Titanopython cerrejonensis), descended from pythons that became the size of a titanoboa. It resembles a long-extinct titanoboa. Just like its ancestors, it is constrictor snake. They are the last group of pythons of Florida.
  • Florida Pig, descended from feral pigs that were introduced in the 1400's by European settlers. It resembles a hybrid of a domestic pig and a wild boar and are the size of their ancestors. They are fully herbivorous, unlike their ancestors, which were omnivorous.
  • Florida Vervet Monkey, descended from vervet monkeys that were introduced to Florida by humans. They are similar to their ancestors.
  • Florida Dodo, descended from dodos that were brought back by humans. They are good tree climbers, unlike their ancestors, having macaw-like feet to climb trees in order to escape from ground-dwelling predators like titanopythons, alligators, wolves, bears, cougars, sword-toothed cats, etc. They fill a similar niche to South American macaws, feeding on nuts, leaves, and fruit. It is similar to the Hawaiian Tree Dodo.
  • Steller's Sea Cow, A sea cow that was extinct in the 1800's but was brought back by humans. Nothing much else has changed.
  • Sarcosuchus, A 40 Ft. crocodile that was extinct but was brought back from extinction by humans. Nothing else has changed.
  • Flower Tree, descended from a native species of flower in Florida. There are many species of flower tree. Once, there were problems for the gigabutterflies, and then, a species of flower evolved into the flower tree, so that gigabutterflies don't go extinct.

African Grasslands

The African grasslands has stayed the same, even in 5 million years' time. The future ice age has wiped out most rainforests in the world, including most of Africa's rainforests. Primates, such as gorillas, chimpanzees, etc. have adapted to the African grasslands. Most present-day African animals are still alive in the future, even elephants, lions, hyenas, etc.

Hypothesized Species
  • African Dylanus (Dylanus robumy), a common species of native dylanus of Africa. Same species alive today.
  • African Bush Elephant (Loxodonta africana), a large elephant which inhabits grasslands of Africa. Nothing about this animal changed from modern African elephants.
  • African Lion (Panthera leo), a large species of big cat. Nothing much is changed, other than it has a wolf-like tail instead of a long tail.
  • Warthog, a species of native wild pig. This animal hasn't changed much from modern warthog.
  • Antelope, a group of diverse hoofed mammals. Almost all species are still present and they haven't changed much since modern times.
  • White Rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum), a species of large mammal of Africa. Nothing much about this animal has changed.
  • Cape Buffalo (Syncerus caffer), a large species of native cattle of Africa. Nothing much is changed.
  • Hippopotamus (Hippopotamus amphibius), a large and aggressive native herbivore. Nothing much is changed.
  • Cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus), a large and fast-moving cat. Nothing much is changed.
  • Leopard (Panthera pardus), a relatively small species of big cat. Nothing much is changed.
  • Zebra (Equus quagga), a striped species of wild horse in Africa. Nothing much is changed.
  • Giraffe, a very tall hoofed mammal in Africa. Nothing much is changed.
  • African Wild Dog, a species of native canid. Nothing much is changed.
  • Hyena, a group of large carnivorous relatives of mongooses. Nothing much is changed. All species of hyenas still exist.
  • Jackal, a smalk coyote-like wild dog of Africa. Nothing much is changed.
  • Ostrich (Struthio camelus), a very large flightless bird of Africa. Nothing much is changed.
  • Nile Crocodile, a native species of crocodile in Africa. Nothing much is changed.
  • Savanna Chimpanzee, descended from common chimpanzees that adapted to live in the grasslands after most of their jungle habitats died. They evolved into a fully bipedal australopithecus-like animals.
  • Chalicorilla, descended from gorillas that adapted from rainforests to savannas. They are more chalicothere-like in body plan than their ancestors. They are very common in both wet and dry parts of savannas in Africa. They are fully herbivorous, unlike their ancestors, which fed on mostly plants and sometimes insects.
  • African Tapir, descended from tapirs that escaped from zoos in Africa. They resemble a mountain tapir, but is more adaptable to live in grasslands and is about the size of a now-extinct Malayan tapir.
  • Grassland Meerkat, descended from meerkats that spread to most of Africa due to absence of most of Africa's rainforests. They are similar to their ancestors of South Africa.
  • Dinopanthera (Panthera pardus fatalis), descended from a group of leopards that replaced the prehistoric megantereon. They are the main predators of the savanna chimpanzees.
  • African Horse, descended from the introduced feral horses in Africa. They are completely black in color and are still rideable.
  • Savanna Camel, Descended from feral dromedary camels that adapted to live in grasslands of Africa, rather than deserts. They resemble a very large cama (llama/camel hybrids), but is about the size of a bactrian camel due to the abundance of its food source.
  • Savanna Okapi, descended from okapis that adapted to live in grasslands of Africa. They are similar to their ancestors, other than they're now lighter brown in color and they are now both browsers and grazers, not just browsers, unlike their ancestors of the jungles of Africa.
  • African Gray Wolf, descended from gray wolves that spread to Africa due to the land bridge between Africa and Europe was formed, connecting from Spain to Morocco, allowing the interchange between African and European animals to occur. Despite competition from native hyenas and African wild dogs, African gray wolves still thrive.
  • African Fox, descended from red foxes that spread to Africa due to the land bridge between Africa and Europe, connecting from Spain to Morocco, allowing the interchange between African and European animals to occur. They are light brown, rather than red.
  • African Bison, descended from European bison that migrated from Europe to Africa. They resemble their ancestors, but with shorter fur due to the heat in most of Africa.
  • African Grasslands Chicken, a species of chicken in the African Grasslands. It is descended from feral chickens that adapted to live in grasslands after humans went to space. It is the size of a dodo bird. It resembles their ancestors, but they are more turkey-like. They are faster than their ancestors so that they can get away from predators.
  • Crocodylus Thorbjarnarsoni, A once extinct species of crocodile. Nothing else has changed.

European Icelands

Europe is frequented by severe blizzards. Ice sheets cover most of North America, all of Scandinavia, and almost all of Europe. Sea levels have dropped approximately 500 feet (150 meters). A great deal of the land just south of the ice is covered in barren tundra. Temperatures drop to -70 degrees Celsius. Very few plants and barely any trees grow from the shallow soil.

Hypothesized Species
  • European Dylanus, a very common dylanus species of Europe. Same as today's species.
  • European Bison, a large woolly bovine of Europe. Nothing much is changed.
  • Musk Ox, a large cattle-like sheep-goat. Nothing much is changed.
  • Red Deer, a species of native deer. Nothing much is changed.
  • Gray Wolf (Canis lupus), a large predatory canid. Nothing much is changed.
  • European Brown Bear, a species of large native bear. Nothing much is changed.
  • Polar Bear (Ursus maritimus), a very large and very carnivorous bear species, which is found in northern Europe, northern Siberia, and northern North America. Nothing much is changed.
  • Marmot, a small and social ground squirrel. Nothing much is changed.
  • Wolverine, a large and bear-like mustlid which is mostly carnivorous. Nothing much is changed.
  • Seal, a group of small to large amphibious marine mammals. Almost all species of seals are still alive. Nothing much is changed.
  • Walrus, a large species of pinniped that is very closely related to seals. Nothing much is changed.
  • Humpback Whale, a very large baleen whale that is a very common sight to most places, including the shorelines off the coast of Europe. Nothing much about this animal is changed.
  • Beluga, a large and social white-colored toothed whale species. Nothing much is changed.
  • Narwhal, a large and tusked species of toothed whale. Nothing much is changed.
  • Orca, a very large carnivorous dolphin which is distinct by its black and white coloration. Nothing much is changed.
  • Northern Bottlenose Dolphin, descended from bottlenose dolphins that adapted to live in the cold. Other than having blubber, nothing much is changed.
  • New Irish Deer, descended from roe deer that evolved to replace the extinct Irish elk (although it wasn't an elk, despite its name, but a relative of a roe deer, so it is more appropriately named giant Irish deer). They are very common herbivores. They are Irish elk-like in size and appearance.
  • Shagrat, descended from a species of marmots that fill a similar niche to musk oxen, one of their neighbors. These sheep-size capybara-like woolly rodents often migrate with musk oxen to escape from the cold.
  • Snowstalker (Decipiolodon glacies) very large white-colored bear-like mustlid that replaced the prehistoric European megantereon. They have saber-teeth (much like a saber-tooth cat) to hunt bison, musk oxen, shagrats, deer, and sometimes belugas and rarely gannetwhales. It resembles a polar bear, but with saber teeth.
  • Gannetwhale (Morus caetus), descended from gannets that evolved a similar niche to seals and toothed whale species. Despite competition from native seals and toothed whales, gannetwhales thrive in this place. Gannetwhales are very large flightless seal-like seabirds.
  • Woolly Mammoth (Mammuthus primigenius), a hairy elephant that was once extinct by humans. It was resurrected by scientists in the 2020s. Same as the extinct species.
  • European Smilodon, descended from smilodons that were once extinct by humans. It was resurrected by scientists in the mid-2020s. It wasn't native to Europe, but after having escaped from zoos after people disappeared, they evolved into native European smilodons.
  • European Gazelle, descended from African gazelles that spread to Europe after Spain got connected to Morocco, allowing fauna interchange between Africa and Europe.
  • European Camel, descended from dromedary camels that spread to Europe from Africa after the land bridge between Spain and Morocco was formed. They resemble a cross between a dromedary camel and a Bactrian camel with just one hump on its back.
  • European Lion, descended from African lions that escaped from zoos of Europe. They resemble a long-extinct Asiatic lion, but with woolly fur to survive the cold winter.
  • European Wild Horse, descended from feral horses that were introduced to Europe to replace the extinct wild horse species of Europe, including the tarpan. They resemble an extinct tarpan, but with woolly fur to survive the cold winter.
  • European Icelands Rabbit, descended from European rabbits that adapted to the now-cold Europe. Its main predators are lions, smilodons, wolverines, snowstalkers, and other native predators. They resemble an arctic hare.
  • Arctic Fox, a species of fox that lives in the Arctic. Same species alive today.
  • European Icelands Mouse, descended from house mice that adapted to live in the now-cold Europe.

Australian Savannas

Australia has moved north and collided with New Guinea and parts of Indonesia, pushing them northwestwards and causing them to fuse into Southeast Asia. Carnivores of Indonesia migrate to the savannahs and take over future Australia as top predators. The savannah of Australia has still stayed the same.

Hypothesized Species
  • Red Kangaroo, a very large species of kangaroo that was the largest marsupial until giant ground wombats had evolved. Nothing much is changed.
  • Common Wombat, a small herbivorous marsupial. Nothing much is changed.
  • Tasmanian Devil, a small carnivorous marsupial that once lived just in Tasmania in the Holocene until humans reintroduced them to mainland Australia. Nothing much is changed.
  • Wallaby, a group of small kangaroo-like herbivorous marsupials. Almost all species of wallabies are still alive. Nothing much is changed.
  • Emu, a large native flightless bird of Australia. Nothing much is changed.
  • Giant Ground Wombat, descended from common wombats that became the largest marsupials on earth, about the size of a prehistoric diprotodon, and also resembling diprotodons in appearance, niche, diet, and locomotion. They are very common sights in future Australia.
  • Mainland Thylacine, descended from thylacines that were brought back by humans and were reintroduced to both mainland Australia and Tasmania. After dingos died out, thylacines became apex predators.
  • Gigaroo, descended from gray kangaroos that grew larger and became bipedal walkers, rather than hoppers. They have a theropod dinosaur-like locomotion, but like their ancestors, they are still herbivorous, although they now browsers, rather than grazers.
  • Marsupial Otter, descended from Tasmanian devils that were reintroduced to mainland Australia by humans. They are more river otter-like than their ancestors, but are still very aggressive and are marsupials.
  • Killer Rat, descended from rats that were introduced to Australia by humans. They resemble a long-extinct thylacoleo in body plan.
  • Australian Rabbit, descended from European rabbits that were introduced to Australia by early human settlers from Europe in 1800's. They caused most species of small marsupials to go extinct.
  • False Genyornis, descended from emus that replaced the gigantic flightless prehistoric relatives of ducks, the genyornis. They are omnivores that mostly feed on grass, leaves, and berries, but can occasionally feed on carrion to supplement their diet and when they do, nothing gets in their way.
  • Giant Frilled Necked Lizard, descended from frilled necked lizards which grew much bigger due to the abundance of its food source, they grew until they were about the size of an extinct megalania, although they didn't replaced megalanias since they feed only on smaller creatures, so the largest animals they prey on are small kangaroo species. Other than their size, nothing much is changed.
  • New Megalania, descended from Komodo dragons that took over the niche of extinct megalania. They eat kangaroos, giant ground wombats, and other mammals of future Australia. They resemble their ancestors, but about the size of a megalania.
  • Land Platypus, descended from a group of platypuses that adapted to the savannahs. They are now fully terrestrial, rather than aquatic.
  • Marsupial Rabbit, a species of marsupial in the future. It is descended from koalas, and it resembles an Australian rabbit, but with a pouch.
  • Australian Tiger, descended from Sumatran tigers that now live in Australia due to the continent colliding with Indonesia. They resemble a Bengal tiger, but with yellowish fur rather than orange.
  • Australian Macaque, descended from macaques that now live in Australia, due to a collision course with the Australian continent, New Guinea, and parts of Indonesia.

The Great Plains

The great plains has still stayed the same, even in a future ice age. Animals, such as most present-day animals, and new creatures, rule the great plains.

Hypothesized Species
  • Plains Bison, a large woolly herbivorous hoofed mammal the was almost made extinct by humans, but after humans disappeared, their population recovered. Same species alive today.
  • Elk, a very large hoofed mammal that is fast and agile. Same species alive today.
  • Whitetail Deer, a very common species of medium size deer of North America. Same species alive today.
  • Pronghorn, a common antelope-like hoofed herbivorous mammal. Same species alive today.
  • Grizzly Bear, a large omnivorous species of bear. Same species alive today.
  • American Black Bear, a species of very common bear of North America. Same species alive today.
  • Cougar, aka the puma, it is a very large species of cat, slightly larger than a leopard. Despite being called mountain lion, it isn't a lion at all, but a relative of a much smaller cat, a house cats. Same species alive today.
  • Bobcat, a large lynx-like cat species of North America. Same species alive today.
  • Lynx, a larger relative of a bobcat that inhabits America, Asia, and Europe. Same species alive today.
  • Gray Fox, a small canid native to North America. Same species alive today.
  • Red Fox, a small canid which is widespread across most continents except Antarctica. Same species alive today.
  • Coyote, a species of small wolf-like wild dog, which, after lions, tigers, and the "resurrected" theropod dinosaurs took over as top predators, became mostly scavengers and predators of smaller mammals and birds.
  • Red Wolf, a small species of wolf of North America. After it was made extinct by humans, humans brought red wolves back through De-Extinction. Same species alive today.
  • Gray Wolf, a large aggressive wild canid of Asia, Africa, Europe, and Americas. Same species alive today.
  • Prairie Dog, a species of large ground squirrel, which is named for their sounds, which sounds like a dog bark. Same species alive today.
  • Black-footed Ferret, a small mustlid-grouped carnivorous mammal of North America. It was almost made extinct by humans, but after humans disappeared, the black-footed ferrets have recovered.
  • North American Lion, descended from African lions that escaped from zoos. They are one of the apex predators of North America. They are similar to their ancestors.
  • American Tiger, descended from Siberian tigers that were introduced to northern parts of North America as part of the Pleistocene Rewilding project. They are one of the top predators of the grasslands of North America. They are similar to their ancestors.
  • American Wild Boar, a subspecies of wild boar, which is descended from wild boars that were brought to North America by humans. They are similar to their ancestors, but are no longer invasive species as their population is now being controlled by lions, tigers, and carnivorous theropod dinosaurs.
  • North American Common Tapir, descended from tapirs that were introduced as part of the Pleistocene Rewilding project. They resemble a mountain tapir, but is about the size of the Baird's tapir.
  • North American Giant Tapir, descended from tapirs that were introduced as part of the Pleistocene Rewilding project. They resemble a mountain tapir, but is about two times the size of a Malayan tapir, making it the largest tapirs on earth.
  • Prairie Peccary, descended from collared peccaries that spread to most of North America after humans went to space. They are similar to their ancestors, but can now survive into newer habitats and climates (much like wild boars).
  • American Zebra, descended from zebras that escaped from zoos. They are similar to their ancestors.
  • American Camel, descended from dromedary camels that were introduced to North America as part of the Pleistocene Rewilding project. They are similar to their ancestors.
  • North American Guanaco, descended from guanacos that were introduced to North America as part of the Pleistocene Rewilding project.
  • American Common Elephant, descended from Asian elephants that were introduced as part of the Pleistocene Rewilding project. They are similar to their ancestors. They migrate south when winter is coming, but migrate back north when winter is over.
  • American Greater Elephant, descended from African elephants that escaped from zoos. They are similar to their ancestors. They migrate south when winter is coming, but migrate back north when winter is over.
  • American Woolly Mammoth, descended from the "resurrected" woolly mammoths that escaped from zoos. They are similar to their ancestors.
  • New Columbian Mammoth, descended from the "resurrected" woolly mammoths that escaped from zoos. They replaced the prehistoric Columbian mammoth. They are also similar to the Columbian mammoth. They migrate south with American common elephants and American greater elephants when winter is coming, but migrates north when winter is over.
  • American Mastodon, a species of woolly elephant that was extinct in the Late Pleistocene, but was brought back by humans and were reintroduced back to North America as part of the Pleistocene Rewilding. They are similar to their ancestors.
  • North American Cheetah, descended from cheetahs that were introduced to North America as part of the Pleistocene Rewilding project. They are similar to their ancestors. They are responsible for controlling the populations of pronghorn.
  • American Macaque, descended from macaques that were introduced to Florida and Texas by humans. There are more than 1,000 species of North American macaques, ranging from vervet monkey size to olive baboon size ones.
  • American Baboon, descended from baboons that escaped from zoos. They are similar to their ancestors. There are more than 500 species of American baboons, ranging from rhesus macaque size to geleda size ones.
  • American Rhinoceros, descended from white rhinoceroses that escaped from zoos. They are similar to their ancestors.
  • American Buffalo, descended from Cape buffaloes that escaped from zoos. They are similar to their ancestors.
  • Glyptodonts, a group of giant megafaunal armadillos that were extinct, but were brought back by humans. They range from doedicurus-like forms to glyptotherium-like forms.
  • Northern Ground Sloths, descended from Shasta ground sloths that were brought back by humans. There are more than 250 species of northern ground sloths, ranging from Shasta ground sloth size to giant ground sloth size ones.
  • Chalicothere, a group of browsing hoofed mammals that were once extinct, but were brought back by humans using genetic engineering, by selecting appropriate kinds of animals until they resemble an extinct chalicothere. They range from chalicotherium-like ones to Ancylotherium-like ones.
  • Indricotherium, a giant girafe-like rhinoceros which was extinct, but were brought back by humans using genetic engineering, by selecting appropriate kinds of animals until they resemble an extinct indricotherium. They are similar to their Oligocene ancestors.
  • Plains Alligator, descended from alligators that became terrestral and have spread to most of North America, ranging from California to the east coast forests. They resemble a mesozoic notosuchus.
  • Sabre Tyrant (Tyrannosaurus rex fatalis), descended from tyrannosaurus rex that was brought back by humans using genetic engineering, by selecting appropriate kinds of animals until they resemble an extinct tyrannosaurus rex. The ancestors of sabre tyrants escaped from zoos. They are the apex predators of North America. They resemble a tyrannosaurus rex, but with elongated "saber" teeth to kill their prey, including indricotheres, chalicotheres, elephants, mammoths, mastodons, sauropods, iguanodonts, and hadrosaurs.
  • Giant Phantom, descended from baryonyx that was brought back by humans using genetic engineering, by selecting appropriate kinds of animals until they resemble an extinct baryonyx. The ancestors of giant phantoms escaped from zoos. They are named because they are large (about the size of an allosaurus) almost white in color, being covered by white feathers to keep them warm in the cold climate, as well as blending in with the environment to stalk unsuspecting prey.
  • Sauropod, group of giant long-necked herbivorous dinosaurs which were extinct, but were brought back by humans using genetic engineering, by selecting appropriate kinds of animals until they resemble an extinct sauropod. Their ancestors escaped from zoos. They are similar to their ancestors.
  • Iguanodont, group of herbivorous ornithopod dinosaurs that were extinct since the Cretaceous era, but were brought back by humans using genetic engineering, by selecting appropriate kinds of animals until they resemble an extinct iguanodont. Their ancestors escaped from zoos. They are similar to their ancestors.
  • Hadrosaur, group of duck-billed herbivorous ornithopod dinosaurs that were once extinct since the Cretaceous era, but were brought back by humans using genetic engineering, by selecting appropriate kinds of animals until they resemble an extinct hadrosaur. Their ancestors escaped from zoos. They are similar to their ancestors.
  • Plains Dodo, descended from dodos that were brought back to life by humans. Dodos are so popular that humans introduced them into parts of the world.
  • Rabbit, a very common small herbivorous mammal. Same species alive today.

North American Forest

Forests in North America and the United States still exist, even in a future ice age. They exist in the northwestern parts of United States, and some parts of the eastern United States. The new animals that live here were either introduced by humans, or might have migrated here. Hypothesized Species

  • American common dylanus, a species of native American dylanus that is abundant, hence their name. Same species alive today.
  • Elk, a very large hoofed mammal that is fast and agile. Same species alive today.
  • Whitetail Deer, a very common species of medium size deer of North America. Same species alive today.
  • American Black Bear, a species of very common bear of North America. Same species alive today.
  • Cougar, aka the puma, it is a very large species of cat, slightly larger than a leopard. Despite being called mountain lion, it isn't a lion at all, but a relative of a much smaller cat, a house cats. Same species alive today.
  • Bobcat, a large lynx-like cat species of North America. Same species alive today.
  • Lynx, a larger relative of a bobcat that inhabits America, Asia, and Europe. Same species alive today.
  • Gray Fox, a small canid native to North America. Same species alive today.
  • Red Fox, a small canid which is widespread across most continents except Antarctica. Same species alive today.
  • Coyote, a species of small wolf-like wild dog, which, after lions, tigers, and the "resurrected" theropod dinosaurs took over as top predators, became mostly scavengers and predators of smaller mammals and birds.
  • Red Wolf, a small species of wolf of North America. After it was made extinct by humans, humans brought red wolves back through De-Extinction. Same species alive today.
  • Gray Wolf, a large aggressive wild canid of Asia, Africa, Europe, and Americas. Same species alive today.
  • American Tiger, descended from Siberian tigers that were introduced to northern parts of North America as part of the Pleistocene Rewilding project. They are one of the top predators of North America's forests. They are similar to their ancestors.
  • American Wild Boar, a subspecies of wild boar, which is descended from wild boars that were brought to North America by humans. They are similar to their ancestors, but are no longer invasive species as their population is now being controlled by lions, tigers, and carnivorous theropod dinosaurs.
  • North American Common Tapir, descended from tapirs that were introduced as part of the Pleistocene Rewilding project. They resemble a mountain tapir, but is about the size of the Baird's tapir.
  • Prairie Peccary, descended from collared peccaries that spread to most of North America after humans went to space. They are similar to their ancestors, but can now survive into newer habitats and climates (much like wild boars).
  • Forest Rattleback, a species of rattleback which is closely related to the desert rattleback of Kansas' deserts, but lives in the forests instead of deserts.
  • Forest Deathgleaner, a species of deathgleaner-grouped daytime predatory bat which lives in North America's forests.
  • Grizzly Bear, a large omnivorous species of bear. Same species alive today.
  • Forest Chicken, descended from domestic chickens that were introduced into the forest.
  • Bald Eagle, a large species of sea eagle, that preys on fish and small mammals. It gets it's name from the white-feathers it possess on it's head. Same species alive today.
  • Mallard, a species of duck which the male has a green head, and the female is colored brown. Same species alive today.
  • North American White-faced Whistling Duck, descended from white-faced whistling ducks that were accidentally introduced into North America in the Late Holocene. They are similar to their ancestors, but can now tolerate colder climates and habitats, thus making them immune to frostbites.
  • American Turkey, a large gamebird which is native to North America. Same species alive today, other than it is slightly larger than today's species due to lack of humans hunting them.
  • North American Forest Birds, almost all native birds alive today still exist.
  • Forest Sheep, descended from domestic sheep that were introduced by humans. Their main predators are wolves, snakes, lions, tigers, deathglaners, etc.
  • North American Thylacine, descended from Tasmanian tigers that were introduced by humans in the 2100s. They are similar to their ancestors.
  • North American Wallaby, descended from wallabies that were introduced to North America by humans in the 2100's for hunting for sports. They are similar to their ancestors.
  • North American Koala, descended from koalas that escaped from zoos and became invasive after eucalyptus trees became invasive due to humans introduced eucalyptus trees to North America. North American koalas are similar to their ancestors.
  • North American Gray Kangaroo, descended from gray kangaroos that escaped from zoos. They are similar to their ancestors.
  • North American Red Kangaroo, descended from red kangaroos that escaped from zoos. They arew similar to their ancestors.
  • American Devil, descended from Tasmainian devils that were introduced to North America in the 2100's. They are similar to their ancestors.
  • Skunk, a species of mammal known for their ability to spray a liquid with a strong odor. Same species alive today.
  • American red squirrel, a species of tree squirrels that lives in forests. Same species alive today.
  • Raccoon, a species of small bear-like carnivoran mammal that lives in forests. Same species alive today.
  • Oak Tree, a species of tree native to the forests of North America. Same species alive today.

Amazon Grasslands

The Amazon basin was the most biodiverse region in the world, but now it has been mostly reduced to stretches of savanna. The area now receives very little rainfall, causing the Amazon river to dwindle. Bushfires are common, ignited by lightning or sunlight.

Hypothesized Species
  • Babookari, a ground-living New World monkey descended from the present-day Uakari. Its main predators are carakillers, big cats, snakes, etc.
  • Carakiller (Titanofalcon unguis), a giant, 2 meter (7 foot) tall, flightless bird of prey, descended from the present-day Caracara. It eats babookaris, sloths, and other herbivorous animals. They resemble a terror bird species, Titanis, in body plan and head plan, but with red feathers, peafowl-like plumes on the back of their heads, a black beak, and velociraptor-like claws. They filled the niche of the prehistoric terror birds.
  • Saber-toothed Ocelot (Smilocelot americanus), a desendant of ocelots that adapted to the Amazon Grasslands. It resembles a saber-toothed cat species, Smilodon, but with ocelot fur. They replaced the saber-toothed tigers of South America.
  • Grasslands Sloth, descended from the two-toed sloth, has became upright (much like humans) and can still climb up trees to avoid predators such as carakillers.
  • Grasslands Opossum, descended from the opossum, can run fast from predators.
  • Savannah Rattleback, a large armoured descendant of pacas which is both carakiller-proof and fire-proof.
  • Macapuchin, a ground-living descendant of caphuchin monkeys. They resemble a hybrid between a capuchin monkey and a macaque.
  • Ground Howler Monkey, descended from howler monkeys that became mostly terrestrial. They resemble a baboon, but with a howler monkey's head instead of a baboon's head.
  • Mega-Peccary, descended from collared peccaries that grew larger, about the size of a rhinoceros, due to predatory competition. They are herbivores that feeds on grass, berries, leaves, and ferns.
  • Tapirphant, descended from mountain tapirs that grew larger, about the size of an Indian elephant, and became gomphothere-like in appearance. They are one of the largest land animals of South America, along with giant ground sloths. They are herbivores that feed on grass and leaves. They have a similar niche to African elephants of Africa and Asian elephants of Asia.
  • South American Dylanus, descended from dylanuses that were introduced to South America by humans. They resemble an American killer dylanus more than their ancestors, other than they're peaceful like their ancestors.
  • Gigantacaw, descended from scarlet macaws that became flightless and gastornis-like in appearance. They are peaceful herbivores that feed on leaves and berries.
  • Giant Ground Sloth, a ground sloth which was brought back by humans. They are similar to their ancestors.
  • South American Common Tapir, descended from Brazilian tapirs that adapted to live in grasslands, by developing slightly longer legs to escape from predators. Other than that, they are similar to their ancestors.
  • Toxodon, originally extinct in the Late Pleistocene, but were brought back by humans. They are similar to their ancestors.
  • Macrauchenia, originally extinct in the Late Pleistocene, but were brought back by humans. They are similar to their ancestors.
  • Glyptodont, two species of glyptodonts, glyptotherium and doedicurus, were once extinct since Late Pleistocene, but were brought back by humans. They are similar to their ancestors.
  • Jaguar, a species of big cat that lives in grasslands and rainforests. Same species alive today.
  • Coati, a small carnivore-grouped mammal of South America. Same species alive today.
  • Giant Anteater, a large and terrestrial anteater species. Same species alive today.
  • Armadillo, almost all armadillos are still alive, even in 5 million years after people. Many are the same species alive today.
  • Agile Sloth, descended from three-toed sloths that became active, fast and agile (hence their name), like a macaque, due to living in grasslands. They now walk much like an African chimpanzee, although they are more built for speed than chimpanzees. Other than their locomotions and their activities, they are similar to their ancestors.
  • TherizinAnteater, descended from giant anteaters that grew much larger (about the size of an Asian elephant) and became bipedal, as well as its claws on its front legs grew larger. They are now not just insectivores, but they also feed on leaves and fruits, due to their new mouth design.
  • Capybara, a large amphibious rodent. Same species alive today.
  • Capypotamus, descended from capybaras that grew larger (about the size of a white rhinoceros) and resembles a prehistoric Josephoartigasia in appearance (except that capypotamus has no tail) and locomotion. They fill a similar niche to the African hippopotamus.
  • South American Hippopotamus, descended from African hippopotamus that were introduced to Colombia by humans. They shrank (to about the size of a wild boar) and became more pygmy hippopotamus-like than their ancestors, although they are more terrestrial and has longer legs to escape than their ancestors.
  • Titanic toucan, descended from toucans that became flightless and became predators. They are one of the rivals of the carakillers.
  • Umbrella of Doom, despite its name, it is not a real umbrella. It is actually descended from umbrella birds that became predatory hunters. They resemble a hybrid of an umbrella bird and a vulture. They eat dead bodies, obviously.
  • Amazon Grasslands Llama, descended from a herd of llamas that adapted to the grasslands of South America.
  • South American dodo, descended from dodos that were brought back through De-Extinction and were brought to South America due to their popularity as pets.
  • South American Gastornis, descended from Gastornises that were brought back by humans. They are among the dominant large non-mammal herbivores of South America.

The Hawaiian Continent

During millions of years, underwater volcanoes and land volcanoes erupt and turn the tropical islands of Hawaii into a continent smaller than Australia. Animals of Hawaii and the feral animals now rule this new continent together. There are still jungles, but not rainforests, due to a future ice age.

Hypothesized Species
  • Tree Wallaby, descended from introduced brush-tailed rock wallabies. They resemble a hybrid between a wallaby & a tree kangaroo, and like the tree kangaroo, they live in trees for most of their lives. They fill a similar niche to tree kangaroos.
  • Hawaiian Wild Boar, descended from introduced domestic pigs on Hawaii. They are now the size of a very large domestic cattle and are now completely herbivorous, filling a similar niche to African rhinoceroses. They are one of the top herbivores of the continent, along with elephants and some others.
  • Island Cat, descended from feral cats of Hawaii. They resemble an ocelot more than their ancestors, but are about the size of a jaguar and are the main predators of Hawaiian wild boars.
  • Hawaiian Tropical Birds, almost all native birds alive today still exist. Same species alive today.
  • Hawaiian Elephant, descended from Asian elephants that were introduced in the 2100s.
  • Island Chicken, descended from introduced domestic chickens on Hawaii. They are about the size of a dodo bird, and resembles a hybrid of a chicken and a dodo bird.
  • Hawaiian Tree Snake, descended from brown tree snakes that were stowed away to Hawaii during World War II. They are much bigger than their ancestors, about the size of a Burmese python, due to the abundance of food source. They are also far less venomous than their ancestors due to their larger size means they now prefer constricting rather than injecting venom.
  • Hawaiian Dylanus, descended from dylanuses that were brought to Hawaii by humans. They resemble a hybrid between the American common dylanus and the Madagascar trumpet-nosed dylanus.
  • God Dog, descended from feral dogs of Hawaii. They are named because they are the largest dog species on earth and the largest land mammal carnivore of Hawaii, about the size of a grizzly bear. They resemble a hybrid between a dingo and a Bengal tiger. They are also the top predators of Hawaii.
  • Hawaiian Saltwater Crocodile, descended from saltwater crocodiles that escaped from zoos of Hawaii. They are similar to their ancestors.
  • Hawaiian Goat, descended from feral goats of Hawaii. They resemble an ibex, but has no horns due to less predatation from carnivores. Their main defense against predators is their speed and agility.
  • Hawaiian Sheep, descended from feral sheep in Hawaii. They have shorter fur as Hawaii is a hot and humid place. They have no horns and have longer legs to escape from danger.
  • Moa-Nalo, a species of large goose-like flightless duck that was extinct in the Early Holocene due to humans, but humans brought moa-nalos back. They are similar to their ancestors.
  • Hawaiian Common Dodo, descended from dodos that were introduced by humans in the 2100s. They are more alert and more intelligent than their ancestors.
  • Hawaiian Tree Dodo, descended from dodos that developed the abilitiy to climb up trees. Their neighbors are the tree wallabys, which also live in trees. They are good tree climbers, unlike their ancestors, having macaw-like feet to climb trees in order to escape from ground-dwelling predators like wolves, snakes, big cats, dinosaurs, crocodiles, etc.
  • Hawaiian Tiger, descended from tigers that broke out of zoos. They resemble a hybrid of a Siberian tiger and a saber-toothed cat.
  • Hawaiian Kangaroo, descended from a bunch of kangaroos that were introduced into Hawaii by the 2030s. They are similar to their ancestors. They eat berries, grass, nuts, broad-leaved ground plants, bamboo, and shrubs.

Cold Kansas Desert

During this time of cold temperatures, the central region of the North American continent has become a vast desert. It is just as cold as the Gobi Desert was and is frequently battered by fierce sandstorms. The desert also receives snowfall in higher areas and encounters tornadoes. The few plants that live in this desolate region are hardy and adaptable. The inhabitants of this region, including the armored Rattlebacks, also have to be wary of huge diurnal bats.

Hypothesized species
  • Desert Rattleback, a species of rattleback which lives in the deserts.
  • Desert Deathgleaner, a species of deathgleaner-grouped daytime predatory bat that lives in the Kansas Desert.
  • Spink, a small, mole-like, burrowing bird found in the deserts of Kansas, descended from the present-day quail. Its neighbors are desert moles.
  • Golden Desert Mole, descended from the golden moles that were introduced from Africa by humans in the 2100's, it lives in deserts, just like its ancestors. Its neighbors are the spinks.
  • Greater Desert Mole, descended from the introduced European moles that were brought to North America in the 2100's. Unlike its ancestors, it lives in deserts. Its neighbors are the spinks and golden desert moles.
  • Star-Nosed Desert Mole, descended from the star-nosed moles that live in Kansas deserts. Unlike its ancestors, it lives in deserts. Its neighbors are the spinks, golden desert moles, and greater desert moles.
  • Desert Falcon, descended from peregrine falcons that live in deserts of North America. They are one of the desert deathgleaner's rivals.
  • Northern Babookari, descended from a group of babookaris that migrated north to Kansas deserts. They resemble their ancestors, but has thick fur and sand-proof skin to protect their bodies against sandstorms and colder temperatures.
  • American Scrofa, descended from wild boars that were introduced to North America by humans in 1400's. They resemble their ancestors, but with sand-proof fur.
  • Southern Shagrat, descended from shagrats that migrated south. They are similar to their ancestors, but now have sand-proof fur and are lighter in fur color.
  • Giant Prairie Dog, descended from prairie dogs that grew larger, about the size of a wolverine, making it the largest burrowing rodent on earth. Other than that, they are similar to their ancestors, but with sand-proof fur.
  • American Gryken, descended from black-footed ferrets that were saved from extinction from humans due to their conservation. They are larger and more European gryken-like, but with slightly longer legs to chase down their helpless prey and has sand-proof fur to survive in the sandstorm.
  • Kansas Desert Mule Deer, descended from mule deer that lives in Kansas deserts. They resemble their ancestors, but with sand-proof fur.
  • Kansas Bison, descended from the American bison that lives in Kansas deserts. They are the largest native animals of the Kansas deserts, about the size of a white rhinoceros, bigger than their ancestors, to protect themselves against newly evolved predators. They resemble a hybrid between an American bison and a prehistoric long-horned bison.
  • Desert Rhinoceros, descended from white rhinoceros that broke out of Kansas zoos. It resembles a hybrid between a modern Sumatran rhinoceros and a prehistoric woolly rhinoceros, but also has sand-proof fur, not just cold-proof fur. It is slightly smaller than its ancestors, about the size of a black rhinoceros due to less food and less predators.
  • Desert Tiger, descended from tigers that broke out of Kansas zoos. It resembles a hybrid between a Smilodon and a liger. It has sand-proof fur to protect their bodies against sandstorms and colder temperatures.
  • Desert Wolf, descended from a pack of grey wolves that migrated to the deserts of Kansas. It resembles a hybrid of a grey wolf and a red wolf. It has sand-proof fur to protect their bodies against sandstorms and colder temperatures.
  • Desert Weasel, descended from long-tailed weasels that adapted to live in this cold desert.
  • Coyote, a species of small wolf-like wild dog. Same species alive today.
  • Kansas Alligator, descended from American alligators that are completely terrestrial. They now have sand-proof eyelids and blubber to survive in cold sandstorms.
  • Kansas Roadrunner, a species of roadrunner that lives in Kansas deserts. They are omnivores. They are similar to their ancestors, but with thick sand-proof feathers to survive the cold sandstorms.
  • False Titanis, descended from roadrunners that evolved into fully terrestrial flightless giant carnivorous birds. They resembles a cross between a modern roadrunner and an prehistoric titanis, hence their name. Unlike carakillers from South America, this bird is already adapted to hunt alone, so it's a solitary killer that hunts deer, shagrats, and American scrofas.

Asian Spirit Forest

Hypothesized species
  • Giant Panda, a large and herbivorous bear. Same species alive today.
  • Megapanda, descended from a group of giant pandas that grew larger and more megatherium-like in appearance, locomotion, and niche.
  • Chinese Elephant, descended from Asian elephants that migrated to China after people disappeared. It is similar to its ancestors
  • Asian Dylanus, a species of native dylanus of Asia. Same species alive today.
  • Chinese Leopard, descended from leopards that migrated to China after people disappeared. It is similar to its ancestors.
  • Asian Tapir, descended from Baird's/Brazilian tapir hybrids that escaped from zoos. In Malaysia, they replaced the now-extinct Malayan tapirs, and Asian tapirs are found throughout most of mainland Asia as well as throughout Indonesia (including both Borneo and Sumatra). They are bigger than their ancestors, about the size of the now-extinct Malayan tapir.
  • Tiger, a carnivorous big cat native to Asia. Same species alive today.
  • Indian Lion, descended from African lions that escaped from zoos. They are similar to their ancestors. They replaced the now-extinct Asiatic lions that went extinct by humans.
  • Asian Dragon, descended from Komodo Dragons that were introduced in the mid-2030's. They have filled some parts of the niches of Asiatic lions that went extinct by humans.
  • Asian White Rhino, descended from southern white rhinos that were introduced to China by humans. They are similar to their ancestors.
  • Knobbed Hornbill, a species of hornbill native to southeast Asian islands, but is now found in many mainland parts of southern, southeastern, and eastern Asia.
  • Asian Ground Hornbill, descended from a group of knobbed hornbills that became semi-terrestrial and evolved to become similar to the Abyssinian ground hornbill of Africa.
  • Great Hornbill, a species of large arboreal hornbill. It is now more widespread across Asia than today due to more widespread rainforests, other than that, they are the same species alive today.
  • Megabill, descended from a group of great hornbills that grew to gigantic proportions (about the size of an emu) and is now completely flightless. It resembles a cross between the Abyssinian ground hornbill and a prehistoric Gastornis. It is a herbivore that feeds on fruits, seeds, roots, tubers, and shoots.
  • Spirit Forest Rhino, descended from Indian rhinos that migrated to the Spirit Forests of the Asian continent.
  • Emperor Cobra, descended from genetically engineered king cobras. They resemble their ancestors, but are far less poisonous and are much bigger, about the size of a reticulated python.
  • Indian Giant Dylanus, originally extinct in the Late Pleistocene, but humans brought them back somewhere around the Late Holocene. They are similar to their ancestors.
  • Red Panda, a panda-like herbivorous relatives of North American raccoons. Same species alive today.
  • Forest Camel, descended from domestic bactrian camels that escaped into the wild after their human masters disappeared. They resemble a furry cama (camel/llama hybrids).
  • Gigantopithecus, originally extinct in the Late Pleistocene, but humans brought these largest apes on earth back. They are similar to their ancestors.
  • Spirit Forest Mammoth, descended from woolly mammoths that broke out of Asian zoos. It is similar to its ancestors.
  • Giant Red Panda, descended from red pandas that grew larger (about the size of a cheetah) and became fully bipedal to run away from fast-moving predators. They have a simiar locomotion to theropod dinosaurs. It is a herbivore that feeds on (like its ancestors) bamboo, but unlike its ancestors, it also now feeds on leaves, flowers, and berries.
  • Chinese Gray Wolf, descended from Indian wolves that migrated to China after their former human rulers disappeared. They are similar to their ancestors.

Mediterranean Basin

Once a great sea, the Mediterranean has become a large salt basin due to the collision course of Africa and Europe. The area is about 6,500 feet or 2,000 meters below sea level. It consists of brine lakes and salt flats that turn into salty mush in the rare event that it rains. The islands of the Mediterranean now dot the landscape as mountains. Due to high salinity, only bacteria and algae survive in the Mediterranean lakes. Brine flies have been able to flourish here as well.

Hypothesized Species
  • European Gryken, descended from pine martins that adapted to live in the flats. It has a slender-shaped body and short legs, perfect for going through crevices. It is one of the main predators of baby European scrofas.
  • European Scrofa, descended from European wild boars that adapted to live in the flats. They have long legs like a clipspringer antelope to climb over rough rocky edges better than their ancestors.
  • Cryptile, a species of lizard with a sticky frill for catching brine flies.
  • Brine Fly, a species of fly of the flats. Same species alive today.
  • Mediterranean Toad, descended from African toads that migrated to the Mediterranean Flats.
  • Flats Dylanus, descended from European dylanuses that mirgated to the flats. They are more drought-tolerant and more agile than their ancestors.
  • Mediterranean Lion, descended from African lions that live in the flats. They are one of the main predators for European scrofas. They are slightly smaller and more skinnier than their ancestors due to the heat and less prey than mainland Africa.
  • Clipspringer, an antelope that was originally native to Africa, but now also lives in the Mediterranean flats. Same species alive today.
  • Mediterranean Ibex, descended from ibexes which lives on the flats. They are similar to their ancestors, but can live longer without water and food than their ancestors, and they are also slightly smaller than their ancestors.

The Ocean

  • Modern Whales, the modern whales including humpback whales and other still exist, even in 5 million years later.
  • Pinnipeds, many species of seals and sea lions are still alive.
  • Fish, many modern fish, including sharks, reef fishes, and other are still alive.
  • Marine Invertebrates, many invertebrates including cephalopods, crustaceans, and others are still alive.
  • Sea Turtles, many sea turtle species are still alive, even in 5 million years from now.
  • Plesiosaurs, descended from plesiosaurs that were introduced to modern oceans by humans. Nothing much is changed.
  • Polycotylid, descended from polycotylids (fast moving pliosaur-like plesiosaurs) that were introduced to modern oceans by humans. Nothing much is changed.
  • Basilosaurus, large primitive predatory whales originally from the Eocene's oceans. They're now top predators of not just dorudons, but also plesiosaurs, dolphins, and polycotylids.
  • Reef Coelacanth, descended from coelacanths that migrated to the reef.
  • Woolly Whale, descended from a species of whale that grew fur. They are completely covered with fur, similar to the Woolly Mammoth, due to the future ice age.
  • Shark, many sharks are still alive in the future. They are the most successful predators to ever live.
  • Dorudon, a small primitive whale, which is one of Basilosaurus's prey.

50 million years' time

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100 million years' time

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150 million years' time

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200 million years' time

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250 million years' time

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300 million years' time

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350 million years' time

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1 billion years' time

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