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Quincy: The Conspiracy is a 2007 anime film based on the manga series by Ryotaro Sekizawa. It serves as a follow-up to the 2005 film The Story of Quincy, however, unlike that film, rather than being adapted from a volume of the manga, this film instead has an original story, with a manga adaptation being made to tie in with the film. The screenplay was written by Ichirō Ōkouchi and Akihiro Nishino.

Unlike the previous film, Garrett Fredrickson didn't have any involvement in this film due to him working on other films and having a two-picture contract with Walt Disney Pictures, as such, it was entirely a Japanese production rather than a co-production between Japan and the United States. The film was released in Japan by Shochiku on August 11, 2007 and in the United States by Paramount Pictures on May 9, 2008.

Plot

Coming soon!

Voice Cast

Character Japanese actor English actor
Quincy McShane Tomokazu Seki James Arnold Taylor
Valen Grimholt Takayuki Sugō Alfred Molina
Princess Sophie Williams Junko Iwao Kari Wahlgren
Captain Saffron Daisuke Namikawa Maurice LaMarche
Louis Daisuke Ono Sean Hayes
Chief Aarons Takaya Hashi Dylan McDermott
Zach T. Darwin Kappei Yamaguchi Michael McShane
Megan Knowles Marina Inoue Kate Higgins
Tamara Hart Ayako Kawasumi Amber Tamblyn
Ryan Valdez Kenshō Ono Johnny Yong Bosch
Harlan Preston Kenichi Suzumura Steve Staley
Felicia Goodman Sarah Emi Bridcutt Sarah Michelle Gellar
Queen Amelia Hitomi Nabatame Debra Mooney
Baron von Frederick Kōichi Tōchika Martin Short
Sophie's Butler Hisao Egawa John Rafter Lee
Shawn Gibbs Yoshimi Kondou Roger Craig Smith
Reynard Castro Tomokazu Sugita Mandy Patinkin

Additional Voices

  • Troy Baker
  • Dee Bradley Baker
  • Steve Blum
  • Candi Milo
  • Richard Epcar
  • Mela Lee
  • Cam Clarke
  • Barbara Goodson
  • John DeMita
  • Michelle Ruff
  • Sam Riegel
  • Steve Kramer
  • Gregg Berger
  • Jess Harnell
  • Roger Rose
  • Andy Philpot

Production

Coming soon!

Casting

Japanese version

Coming soon!

English version

Nearly all of the voice cast from the English version of The Story of Quincy reprised their roles for this film, with the exceptions of Luke Wilson as Captain Saffron due to scheduling conflicts and Alexis Bledel as Megan Knowles for unknown reasons; as such, Maurice LaMarche and Kate Higgins of Naruto fame voiced the characters in their places. The English dub also features three other voice actors from the Naruto series, Johnny Yong Bosch, Steve Staley and Roger Craig Smith, playing Ryan Valdez, Harlan Preston, and Shawn Gibbs, respectively. Mandy Patinkin, who was hired to voice the investigator Reynard Castro, had previously voiced in the English dub of the Studio Ghibli film Castle in the Sky, while Alfred Molina, who voiced the villainous Valen Grimholt, and Princess Sophie's voice actress, Kari Wahlgren, had previously starred together in the English dub of Steamboy. Mike McShane and John Rafter Lee, meanwhile, had voiced in various projects that Jack Fletcher had directed such as Vampire Hunter D: Bloodlust.

Release

Quincy: The Conspiracy was released in Japanese theaters by Shochiku on August 11, 2007. Paramount Pictures (the US distributor of the first Quincy movie) licensed the film for theatrical distribution in North America in partnership with Kadokawa Pictures USA. Paramount spent $400,000 to acquire the film, $2 million to dub the film into English and approximately $20 million on prints and advertising. The film opened in American theaters on May 9, 2008. It was originally planned to open on June 27 of that year, but the release date was moved up to avoid direct competition with Pixar's Wall-E.

Marketing

To promote the American release of film, Paramount produced a teaser promo utilizing footage from The Story of Quincy which was included on the DVDs of various titles from them such as Babel, Freedom Writers, Shooter, and Next . A panel for the film was later shown at the San Diego Comic Con, and around the same time, a proper trailer for the American release of the film was later attached to the releases of Hot Rod, The Bourne Ultimatum, Becoming Jane, Stardust, Rush Hour 3, Superbad, Halloween, Shoot 'Em Up, Good Luck Chuck, The Kingdom, Michael Clayton and The Final Season. Paramount launched an outdoor advertising campaign at the end of August 2007. Among other tie-ins included 7-Eleven, Duracell, Papa John's Pizza, and Motel 6.

Home media

Quincy: The Conspiracy was released on DVD and Blu-ray in Japan on February 5, 2008 and in the United States on September 9, 2008.

Reception

Box office

Quincy: The Conspiracy opened alongside Speed Racer and What Happens in Vegas and earned $10,390,283 during it's opening day, topping the competition. It grossed a combined total of $34,723,023 during it's opening weekend on 3,000 screens at 2,320 theaters, averaging $9,487 per venue. The film dropped an unexpected 35% over the next weekend. The film closed on July 24, 2008, earning $83,387,237 in the United States and $138,392,203 worldwide.

Critical response

On the review aggregator website Rotten Tomatoes, which categorizes reviews only as positive or negative, 68% of 110 reviews are positive, with an average rating of 6.5/10. The website's critical consensus reads, "Quincy: The Conspiracy doesn't quite live up to it's predecessor, but it's strong visuals and action sequences still make this an entertaining film all around." Metacritic, which uses a weighted average, has assigned the film a score of 66 out of 100 based on reviews from 32 critics, indicating "generally favorable reviews". Audiences polled by CinemaScore gave the film an average grade of "B+" on an A+ to F scale.

Roger Ebert of the Chicago Sun-Times, who gave the predecessor his highest rating of four starts out of four, gave the film three stars out of four, calling it "Not quite as wonderful as it's predecessor, but it's still a fun and enjoyable film nonetheless." Roger Moore of Orlando Sentinel gave the film a positive score, noting that it was "delightfully animated, well acted, and makes for a fun watch." In his Variety review, Todd McCarthy said the film "seems to be a little misguided in some areas, compared to it's predecessor."

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