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North American macaque (SciiFii).jpg

The North American macaque (Macaca floridana), also known as the North American monkey, is a species of macaque that originally did not exist, but has since been created by SciiFii and introduced throughout the rainforests, swamps, forests, and open woodlands across the southeast Florida to help boost biodiversity. It is the only species of Old World monkey of the New World and among the only monkeys of North America, along with the North America capuchin and the runkies. The North American macaque is slightly larger in size than the rhesus macaques, which are native to India and Southeast Asia. North American macaques are diurnal animals, and both arboreal and terrestrial. They are quadrupedal and, when on the ground, they walk digitigrade and plantigrade. They are mostly herbivorous, feeding mainly on fruit, but also eating seeds, roots, buds, bark, and cereals. They are estimated to consume around 139 different plant species in 51 families. During the wet season, they get much of their water from ripe and succulent fruit. North American macaques living far from water sources lick dewdrops from leaves and drink rainwater accumulated in tree hollows. They have also been observed eating termites, grasshoppers, ants, and beetles. When food is abundant, they are distributed in patches, and forage throughout the day in their home ranges. They drink water when foraging, and gather around streams and rivers. North American macaques have specialized pouch-like cheeks, allowing them to temporarily hoard their food. In psychological research, North American macaques have demonstrated a variety of complex cognitive abilities, including the ability to make same-different judgments, understand simple rules, and monitor their own mental states. They have even been shown to demonstrate self-agency, an important type of self-awareness. The conservation status of the North American macaque is Least Concern due to successful conservation efforts, the North American macaque's wide range and, like many other monkeys, its tolerance to most of the human activities, including being able to adapt to life in the cities and suburbs.