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North American capuchin (SciiFii).jpg

The North American capuchin (Sapajus floridanus), also known as the northern capuchin and the North American monkey (not to be confused with the North American macaque, which is also known as the North American monkey), is a species of New World monkey that originally did not exist, but has since been created by SciiFii and introduced throughout the rainforests, forests, swamps, and open woodlands across North America to help boost biodiversity. The North American capuchin is the most widespread simian primate of North America and one of the only species of monkey native to North America, along with the North American macaque and the runkies, and its scientific name is due to the fact that there are massive troops found in Florida, similarly to baboons and macaques. The North American capuchin resembles the closely-related rufted capuchin (Sapajus apella), but with more dull and thicker fur in case of freezing temperatures. The North American capuchin is an omnivorous animal, mostly feeding on fruits and invertebrates, although it sometimes feeds on small vertebrates (e.g. lizards and bird chicks) and other plant parts. Like other capuchins, it is a social animal, forming groups of 8 to 15 individuals that are led by an alpha or dominant male. The North American capuchin is a diurnal, arboreal primate species, but it often forages on the ground to search for food or to walk longer distances between trees that are too far apart to jump. After a gestation period of 180 days, one young is born, or incidentally a twin. This young, which weighs only 200 to 250 grams, is carried on the back of its mother. The mother feeds her child for 9 months, but the young are sexually immature until its seventh year, which is quite late for a primate of its size. The North American capuchin rubs urine on its hands and feet in order to attract mates and reduce stress. The conservation status of the North American capuchin is Least Concern due to successful conservation efforts, the North American capuchin's wide range and its tolerance to many of the human activities.