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When most humans went into outer space, they took a lot of organisms with them. They also domesticated all of the animals (besides chimpanzees) and beings that humans took. In the Late Holocene, humans have mastered domestication of animals and beings, having domesticated more than 2,000 animal species and beings.

Domesticated Species and Former Fictional Beings (Incomplete)

  • Domestic Dog -- The first domesticated animal (& being) and the most popular (along with the domestic cat, domestic wolf, domestic lion, domestic tiger, domestic bear, domestic common dylanus, domestic flashlight dylanus, domestic cheetah, domestic rabbit, Guinea pig, domestic mouse, domestic pig, domestic thylacine, domestic scaled raptor, domestic velociraptor, domestic hyena, domestic meerkat, domestic ferret, domestic microraptor, domestic coelophysis, domestic eoraptor, domestic tapir, domestic cougar, domestic leopard, domestic rahonavis, domestic compsognathus, domestic crocodog, domestic archaeopteryx, domestic Megaman.EXE, domestic Protoman.EXE, domestic Bass.EXE, and domestic Elecman.EXE), it exists in over a thousand races. Very common as free-roaming animals, guide animals, and pets.
  • Domestic Gray Wolf -- Descended from gray wolves that were domesticated by humans in the Late Holocene. Unlike prehistoric wolves (which were the ancestors of domestic dogs), the future domesticated descendants of modern gray wolves remained mostly unchanged (due to they were once isolated from domestic dogs and no longer breeds with domestic dogs, even if they are living and working with domestic dogs), other than they are now more peaceful, more bold, more docile, and less aggressive than their wild ancestors. They are commonly used as free-roaming animals, guide animals, and pets.
  • Domestic Thylacine -- Descended from thylacines that were domesticated by humans. There are now more than 1,550 breeds of domestic thylacines, ranging from poodle-size critters to great dane-sized animals. They were bred to be more tame, more bold, less timid, and less aggressive than their wild ancestors. They are the most popular extinct mammal pets, about as popular as domestic cats. They are also very common as free-roaming animals and guide animals.
  • Domesticated Cheetah -- Domesticated due to their natural shyness. Cheetahs were a candidate to be domesticated, they were probably domesticated in the Middle East. They are the hardest domesticated animal to breed. They are used as free-roaming animals, guide animals, and pets.
  • Domesticated Lion -- Descended from African/Asian lion hybrids that were favored and pets and were domesticated by humans. They were bred to be more bold, more tame, more peaceful, less timid, and less aggressive than their ancestors. They are very popular and are very common as free-roaming animals, guide animals, and pets.
  • Domesticated Tiger -- Descended from Bengal/Siberian tiger hybrids that were domesticated by humans. They were bred to be more bold, more tame, more peaceful, less timid, and less aggressive than their wild purebred ancestors. They are very popular and are very common as free-roaming animals, guide animals, and pets.
  • Domestic Anteater -- Descended from giant anteaters that were domesticated because there were too many of them in zoos. They are most commonly used as pest-controlling animals, free-roaming animals, and pets.
  • Domestic Pronghorn -- Descended from pronghorn that were domesticated by humans. They were bred to be more tame, more docile, more bold, and less timid than their wild ancestors. They are very common as free-roaming animals, garden animals, and a food animals.
  • Domesticated Clouded Leopard -- Domesticated Because they were shy and docile towards Humans. People domesticated them because they thought clouded leopards are fashionable, so they were domesticated. They are very common as free-roaming animals, garden animals, and pets.
  • Domesticated Snow Leopard -- Domesticated because people thought they were fasionable and in the Mid-Holocene, the snow leopards have recovered from humans overhunting them, and later they were favored as pets. They are very common as free-roaming animals, garden animals, guide animals, and pets.
  • Domesticated Cougar -- Descended from cougars because there were too many of them in zoos, so they were domesticated. They were bred to be more tame, more bold, less timid, and less aggressive than their wild ancestors. They are very common as free-roaming animals, laboratory animals, guide animals, and pets.
  • Domesticated Ocelot -- Descended from ocelots because people find them fasionable. They were bred to be more tame, more passive, more bold, less timid, and less aggressive than their wild ancestors. They are very common as free-roaming animals, garden animals, guide animal, and pets.
  • Domesticated Red Fox -- Also known as the silver fox, it is a domesticated form of red foxes. Their coat range from reddish-orange, reddish-brown, orange-brown, grey, white, black, black & grey, black & white, grey & white, black & brown, brown, and silver.
  • Domestic Mink -- A domesticated form of American minks. There are about 45 breeds of domestic minks. They were domesticated for their fur and people find them as good pets. Also common as garden animals and free-roaming animals.
  • Domestic Ferret -- Domesticated form of European polecat. Same breeds still exist, but there are now 456 more breeds than today. They were bred because they were popular as pets. Also very common as garden animals and free-roaming animals.
  • Domestic Kinkajou -- Descended from kinkajous that were domesticated because they were cute. They are very common as free-roaming animals, garden animals, and pets.
  • Domestic Rabbit -- Very common garden animal and pet. They breed fast.
  • Domestic Mouse -- Very common garden animal, laboratory animal, and pet. They breed very fast.
  • Domestic Hamster -- Very common garden animal, free-roaming animal, and pet. They breed very fast.
  • Domestic Rat -- Very common garden animal, laboratory animal, and pet. They breed very fast.
  • Guinea Pig -- Very common garden animal, free-roaming animal, and pet. They breed very fast.
  • Domestic Prairie Dog -- Descended from prairie dogs that were domesticated because people find them cute. They are common as free-roaming animals, garden animals, and pets.
  • Domestic Chinchilla -- A domesticated descendant of chinchallas. They were domesticated because people find them cute. They are also common as laboratory animals, free-roaming animals, and are farmed for their fur.
  • Domestic Degus -- Descended from deguses that were domesticated. They are common as free-roaming animals, garden animals, and pets.
  • Domestic Paca -- Descended from pacas that were domesticated. They are very common as free-roaming animals, garden animals, and pets.
  • Domesticated Agouti -- Descended from agoutis that were domesticated. They are very common as free-roaming animals, garden animals, and pets.
  • Domesticated Mara -- Descended from maras that were domesticated. They are very common as free-roaming animals, garden animals, and pets.
  • Domestic Capybara -- Descended from capybaras that were domesticated because people find them really cute. They are common as free-roaming animals, garden animals, and pets.
  • Domestic Megaman.EXE -- Descended from Megamen.EXEs that were domesticated. They were bred for labor that humans, chimpanzees, dylanuses, or other animals can't do. They are very common as free-roaming humanoids, servants, and pets.
  • Domestic Protoman.EXE -- Descended from Protomen.EXEs that were domesticated. They were bred for labor that humans, chimpanzees, dylanuses, or other animals can't do. They are more passive and less aggressive than their ancestors. They are common as free-roaming humanoids, servants, and pets.
  • Domestic Bass.EXE -- Descended from Bass.EXEs that were domesticated. They were bred for labor that humans, chimpanzees, dylanuses, or other animals can't do. They are more passive and less aggressive than their ancestors. Unlike their ancestors, they do well with dylanuses & other animals and they don't hate humans or any kind of nature. They are very common as free-roaming humanoids, servants, and pets.
  • Domestic Elecman.EXE -- Descended from Elecmen.EXEs that were domesticated. They were bred for labor that humans, chimpanzees, dylanuses, or other animals can't do. They are more passive and less aggressive than their ancestors. Unlike their ancestors, they do well with chimpanzees, dogs, cats, dylanuses, and other species. They are common as free-roaming humanoids, servants, and pets.
  • Domestic Gutsman.EXE -- Descended from Gutsmen.EXEs that were domesticated. They were bred for labor that humans, chimpanzees, dylanuses, or other animals cant"t do. They are more passive, less intelligent (only as intelligent as an ape species such as a gorilla or a chimpanzee), and less aggressive than their ancestors. They can no longer talk due to their vocal cords became slightly more primitive, so the only sounds they could make are grunts, groans, growls, bellows, snorts, moans, and roars, because of this, they are also considered as animals by humans and dylanuses. They are very common as free-roaming animals, laboratory animals, and a food source. They are the largest domesticated animals, second only to an Asian elephant. They are best friends to dylanuses.
  • Domestic Binturong -- Descended from binturongs that were domesticated by humans. They were bred to be more tame, more bold, less timid, and less bothersome than their wild ancestors. They are very common as free-roaming animals, garden animals, guide animals, and pets.
  • Domestic Fossa -- Descended from fossas that were domesticated because people find them cute and were used for pest control. They were bred to be more tame, more docile, more peaceful, less timid, and less aggressive than their wild ancestors of Madagascar. They are common as free-roaming animals, guide animals, and pets.
  • Domestic Genet -- Descended from genets that were domesticated because they were fasionable and are used for pest control. They are common as free-roaming animals and pets.
  • Domestic Mongoose -- Descended from many species mongooses that were domesticated to control rats and other vermin and because people find them very cute. Lots of species of domestic mongooses are very common as free-roaming animals, garden animals, laboratory animals, and pets.
  • Domestic Meerkat -- Descended from Meerkats because there were too many of them in zoos and safari parks, so they were favored as pets. There are different kinds of domestic meerkats, ranging from long-tailed ones to tailless ones, from long-legged ones to short-legged ones, from pure-black ones to pale ones, etc. They are popular pets. They are also common as free-roaming animals and laboratory animals.
  • Domestic Common Dylanus -- A subspecies of dylanus (Dylanus Dylanus) that were domesticated by humans in 2000 B.C. They were the third carnivora to be domesticated due to they resemble a human in appearance, size, intelligence (although not as much as humans, but still smart compared to other species), diet, etc. They most likely originated from North American grasslands (possibly in Colorado or Utah). They like to eat the same food as humans, so they require these food to stay healthy, as dog food or cat food can make them very sick. They make good friends with dogs, cats, foxes, hyenas, Liyote, cocodogs, macawnivores, bear-owls, night furies, meerkats, tapirs, chalicotheres, and bears. They are very common as free-roaming animals, laboratory animals, servant animals, guide animals, and pets.
  • Domestic Flashlight Dylanus -- Descended from genetically engineered domestic dylanus/American common dylanus hybrids that escaped from laboratories. They were made by using the flashlight fish's genes/dna to give a dylanus a pair of light organs on their cheeks. When the flashlight dylanus wants to "shine" to search for potential meals or danger, they open their light organs, if they're done with their light organs for now, they close them up (they close and open their light organs much like the flashlight fish). Their flashlight organs are so attracted by humans that people bred them and their flashlight organs in the domesticated forms comes in many different varieties, red, red orange, orange, yellow orange, yellow, yellow green, green, blue green, indigo, violet, white, and gray. Unlike their ancestors, they can no longer breed with natural domestic dylanuses, since they were genetically altered so they could keep their "flashlight" organs. They are omnivores that need fruits, insects, crustaceans, fish, frogs, small reptiles, and smaller mammals to stay healthy. They resemble a hybrid between the American common dylanus and a domestic dylanus, but with a flashlight organs on its cheeks like the ones found on flashlight fishes.
  • Domestic Hyena -- Descended from brown-striped hyena hyrbids that were domesticated. There are now more than 850 breeds of domestic hyenas, with different shapes and sizes (much like what happened to dogs, but not as diverse). They like to feed on cat food and dog food, unlike their ancestors. They were bred to be more passive, more bold, less aggressive, and less bothersome than their ancestors. They are common as free-roaming animals, guide animals, and pets.
  • Domestic Liyote -- People brought liyotes from the Croods universe and domesticated them. They were bred to be more tame, more bold, less timid, and less aggressive than their wild ancestors. They are common as laboratory animals, free-roaming animals, guide animals, garden animals, and pets.
  • Domestic Crocodog -- Descended from crocopups that were brought from the Croods universe and were domesticated. They were bred to be more tame, more bold, more intelligent, and less bothersome than their ancestors. They are common as laboratory animals, free-roaming animals, guide animals, and pets.
  • Domesticated Macawnivore -- Descended from macawnivores that were brought from the Croods universe and were domesticated by humans. They were bred to be much smaller (about the size of a large dog), more tame, more bold, and less aggressive than their ancestors. They are common as free-roaming animals, guide animals, and pets.
  • Domestic Bear-Owl -- Descended from Bear-Owls from the Croods universe that were domesticated by humans of real life. They were bred to be smaller (about the size of a leopard), more tame, more bold, and less aggressive than their ancestors. They are common as free-roaming animals, guide animals, and pets.
  • Domestic Ground Whale -- Descended from ground whales from the Croods universe that were domesticated by real life humans. They were domesticated to be more tame, more bold, more intelligent, and less bothersome than their ancestors. They are a common food source for humans, and are also common as free-roaming animals and guide animals.
  • Domestic Trip Gerbil -- Descended from trip gerbils from the Croods universe that were domesticated by humans from real life. They were domesticated to be more tame, more intelligent, and less timid than their ancestors. They breed very fast. They are common as garden animals, free-roaming animals, and pets.
  • Domestic Sloth -- People domesticated them because they find them really gentle and cuddly. Their coat ranges from brown to almost black. They can be free-roaming animals, but they are most commonly used as garden animals and pets.
  • Domestic Lemur -- In the Mid-Holocene, many species of primitive primates (including lemurs) were favored as pets. They were bred to be more tame, more bold, less timid, less aggressive, less bothersome, and less destructive. They are also common as free-roaming animals, laboratory animals, and garden animals.
  • Domestic Monkey -- In the Mid-Holocene, many monkey species such as macaques, baboons, South American monkeys, vervet monkeys, etc. were favored as pets. They were bred to be more tame, more bold, less timid, less aggressive, less bothersome, and less destructive than their ancestors. They are also commonly used as free-roaming animals, laboratory animals, and garden animals.
  • Domestic Night Fury -- Descended from HTTYD's night furies that were domesticated by humans of real life. They were bred to be smaller (about the size of a great dane), more tame, more bold, less timid, and less aggressive than their ancestors.
  • Domestic Alexornis -- Despite the failure of Walking With Dinosaurs 2013 movie, some groups of animal breeders in the Late Holocene decided to breed Alexornises since they liked Alex the Alexornis of the movie. Alexornis are now very popular pets and were bred to be more tame, more bold, more docile, and less timid than their ancestors. They are very common as free-roaming animals, garden animals, laboratory animals, and pets.
  • Domestic Archaeopteryx -- Descended from the prehistoric archaeopteryx that were domesticated by humans. They were bred to be more tame, more bold, and less timid than their ancestors. They are very common as free-roaming animals, garden animals, and pets.
  • Domestic Rahonavis -- Descended from the prehistoric rahonavis that were domesticated by humans. They were bred to be more tame, more bold, less timid, and less bothersome than their prehistoric and wild ancestors. They are very common as free-roaming animals, garden animals, pest-controlling animals, and pets.
  • Domestic Troodon -- Descended from the prehistoric troodons that were domesticated by humans. They were bred to be more tame, more bold, less aggressive, and less bothersome than their ancestors. They are commonly used as free-roaming animals, pets, and guide animals.
  • Domestic Microraptor -- Descended from the prehistoric microraptors that were domesticated by humans. They were bred to be more tame, less bothersome, and less timid than their ancestors. They are also very common as free-roaming animals, garden animals, and pets.
  • Domestic Velociraptor -- Descended from the prehistoric velociraptors that were domesticated by humans. They were bred to be more tame, more bold, more intelligent, less timid, and less aggressive than their ancestors. They are the most popular pet dinosaurs, due to the popularity of the (formerly fictional) raptors from Jurassic Park. They are commonly used as free-roaming animals, guide animals, and pets.
  • Domestic Compsognathus -- Descended from the prehistoric compsognathus that were domesticated by humans. They were bred to be more tame, more bold, and less timid, and less bothersome than their ancestors. They are also common as free-roaming animals, garden animals, laboratory animals, and pets.
  • Domestic Ornitholestes -- Descended from the prehistoric ornitholestes that were domesticated by humans. They were bred to be more tame, more bold, less timid, less aggressive, and less bothersome than their ancestors. They are very common as free-roaming animals, garden animals, guide animals, laboratory animals, and pets.
  • Domestic Coelophysis -- Descended from the prehistoric coelophysis that were domesticated by humans. They were bred to be more tame, more bold, less timid, less aggressive, and less bothersome than their ancestors. They are very common as free-roaming animals, garden animals, guide animals, and pets.
  • Domestic Dilophosaurus -- Descended from the prehistoric dilophosaurus that were domesticated by humans. They were bred to be smaller (about the size of a coelophysis), more tame, more bold, less timid, and less aggressive than their ancestors. They are very common as free-roaming animals, garden animals, guide animals, and pets.
  • Domestic Ornithomimid - Descended from many species of prehistoric ornithomimids that were domesticated by humans. They were bred to be more tame, more bold, more docile, less timid, and less aggressive than their ancestors. They were bred for their meat and eggs. They are also very common as free-roaming animals, garden animals, and mounts.
  • Domestic Oviraptorid -- Descended from many species of prehistoric oviraptorid that were domesticated by humans. They were bred to be more tame, more bold, less timid, and less aggressive than their ancestors. They were bred for their meat and eggs. They are also very common as free-roaming animals, garden animals, guide animals, and pets.
  • Domestic Eoraptor -- Descended from the prehistoric eoraptors that were domesticated by humans. They were bred to be more tame, more bold, less timid, and less bothersome than their ancestors. They are very common as free-roaming animals, garden animals, pest-controlling animals, guide animals, and pets.
  • Domestic Herrerasaurus -- Descended from the prehistoric herrerasaurus that were domesticated by humans. They were bred to be smaller (about the size of a coelophysis), more tame, more bold, less timid, less aggressive, and less destructive than their prehistoric/wild ancestors. They are very common as free-roaming animals, garden animals, guide animals, and pets.
  • Domestic Psittacosaurus -- Descended from the prehistoric psittacosaurus that were domesticated by humans. They were bred to be more tame, more docile, more bold, and less timid than their ancestors. They are very common as free-roaming animals, garden animals, and a food source.
  • Domestic Leptoceratops -- Descended from the prehistoric leptoceratops that were domesticated by humans. They were bred to be more tame, more docile, more bold, and less timid than their ancestors. They are very common as free-roaming animals, garden, and food a source.
  • Domestic Protoceratops -- Descended from the prehistoric protoceratops that were domesticated by humans. They were bred to be more tame, more docile, more intelligent (about as smart as a wild boar), more bold, and less timid than their ancestors. They are very common as free-roaming animals, guide animals, and a food source.
  • Domestic Homocephale -- A domesticated descendants of a prehistoric homocephale. They were bred to be more tame, more docile, more bold, more intelligent (about as smart as a domestic horse), and less timid than their ancestors. They are very common as free-roaming animals, garden animals, guide animals, a food source, and pets.
  • Domestic Dracorex -- A domestic animal descended from a prehistoric dracorex. They were bred to be more tame, more docile, more bold, more intelligent (about as smart as a crow), and less timid than their ancestors. They are very common as free-roaming animals, garden animals, guide animals, a food source, and pets.
  • Domestic Stegoceras -- Domesticated form of a prehistoric stegoceras. They were bred to be more tame, more docile, more bold, more intelligent (about as smart as a domestic horse), less timid, and less aggressive than their ancestors. They are very common as free-roaming animals, garden animals, guide animals, a food source, and pets.
  • Domestic Pachycephalosaurus -- A domesticated herbivorous reptile that is descended from prehistoric pachycephalosaurus. They were bred to be smaller (about the size of a stegoceras), more tame, more docile, more bold, more intelligent (about as smart as a domestic horse), less timid, and less aggressive than their ancestors. They are very common as free-roaming animals, garden animals, guide animals, sheperds (protecting leptoceratops, psittacosaurus, homocephales, and stegoceras from predators), and pets. Unlike other pachycephalosaurs, its meat doesn't taste good at all, so people don't want to eat this herbivorous reptile.
  • Domestic Scaled Raptor -- Descended from velociraptors from Jurassic Park/World universe that were domesticated by real humans. They are more intelligent, more bold, more docile, and far less aggressive than their ancestors, other than that, they remained mostly unchanged. They come in four breeds: V1 (JP 1 forms), V2 (JP 2 forms), V3 (JP 3 forms), and V4 (JW forms). They are commonly used as free-roaming animals, guide animals, and pets.
  • Domestic Rhinoceros -- Descended from white rhinoceroses that were domesticated in the Late Holocene. They are more peaceful, more docile, and less blind than their ancestors, other than that, they are mostly unchanged. They are very common as food source, mounts, and free-roaming animals. They are the hardest herbivorous domestic animals to breed.
  • Domestic Hippopotamus -- Descended from common hippopotamuses that were domesticated in the Late Holocene. They are more peaceful, more tame, more docile, and far less aggressive than their wild ancestors, other than that, they are mostly unchanged. They are very common as free-roaming animals, laboratory animals, and food source for humans.
  • Domesticated Leopard -- They were bred to become smaller (about the size of a large dog) and more docile toward humans. Some people thought they were fashionable and were kept as pets. They are also used as free-roaming animals and guide animals.
  • Camel -- Four kinds of camels, dromedary camels, bactrian camels, llamas, and alpacas are important for humans (mounts, wool, etc.). They were the first herbivores to be domesticated. They are common as free-roaming animals, mounts, and a food source.
  • Domestic Horse -- They were the second herbivores to be domesticated (after the camels). They are most commonly used as free-roaming animals and mounts. Miniture breeds are also used as guide animals.
  • Domestic Donkey -- They were bred to carry stuff for humans. Donkeys originated from Africa. They are also common as free-roaming animals.
  • Domestic Chicken -- A common worldwide food source and free-roaming animals. They are more bold and less timid than modern chickens.
  • Domestic Turkey -- A common worldwide food source and free-roaming animals. They are more bold and less timid than modern turkeys.
  • Peacock -- A common free-roaming animal and garden animal. They are more bold and less timid than modern peacocks.
  • Domestic Guineafowl -- A domesticated form of helmeted guineafowl. Very common as free-roaming animals, food source, and pets.
  • Domestic Crow -- Descended from crows that were domesticated because some people find them fasionable, so they were favored as pets. They are more bold and less timid than modern crows.
  • Domestic Seagull -- Descended from seagulls that were domesticated because they were popular and some people find them fasionable, so they were favored as pets. Unlike other seabirds. seagulls can eat anything even if its not from the ocean, make the seagull domestication more likely to happen. They are more bold and less timid than their ancestors.
  • Domestic Duck -- Used commonly as free-roaming animals, garden animals, or food source. They are more bold and less timid than modern ducks.
  • Domestic Goose -- Used as either free-roaming animals, garden animals, or food source. They are more bold, less timid, and less aggressive than modern geese.
  • Mute Swan -- Used as free-roaming animals and garden animals. They are less aggressive than modern mute swans.
  • Domestic Canary -- A domesticated form of Atlantic canary. Most commonly used as free-roaming animals, garden animals, and pets.
  • Society Finch -- A domesticated form of white-rumped munia.
  • Java Sparrow -- A very popular and beautiful passerine bird. Very common as free-roaming animals, garden animals, and pets.
  • Domestic Pigeon -- Used as free-roaming animals and pets. They are more bold and less timid than modern pigeons.
  • Domestic Dove -- A domesticated form of doves. Common as free-roaming animals, garden animals, and pets.
  • Domestic Myna -- Descended from common hill mynas that were domesticated because they were beautiful. They are very common as free-roaming animals, garden animals, and pets.
  • Parrots -- Many parrots, parakeets, and relatives were domesticated because of their beauty and their human speech mimicry. They are very common as free-roaming animals, garden animals, and pets.
  • Domestic Gastornis -- Descended from a prehistoric gastornis that were bred for their eggs and meat. They are herbivores, so they require nuts and fruit to keep them healthy. They are very common as food source, as well as free-roaming animals and pets.
  • Domestic Terror Bird -- Descended from a prehistoric phorusrhacos that were domesticated by humans. They were bred to be smaller (about the size of an emu), more tame, more bold, less timid, and less aggressive than their wild ancestors. Unlike their ancestors, they also need cat food and/or dog food, not just meat, to keep them healthy. They are the most popular pet prehistoric birds. They are very common as guide animals, free-roaming animals, and pets.
  • Domestic Rhea -- Descended from a group of rheas that were domesticated by humans. They were domesticated for their meat and eggs. They are also common as free-roaming animals, garden animals, and pets.
  • Domestic Ostrich -- Descended from ostriches that were domesticated for their meat and eggs. They are also common as free-roaming animals, garden animals, and pets.
  • Domestic Emu -- Descended from Australian emus that were domesticated by humans. They were domesticated for their meat and eggs. They are also very common as free-roaming animals, garden animals, and pets.
  • Gayal -- A domesticated form of wild gaurs. Commonly used as free-roaming animals and food source for people.
  • Domestic Reindeer -- A large animal that is commonly used as free-roaming animals and mounts.
  • Domestic Moose -- A domesticated descendant of moose. They were bred to produce milk. They're also common as free-roaming animals.
  • Domestic Elk -- Descended from Western elk that were domesticated. They are commonly used as free-roaming animals and garden animals. They are more bold, less timid, and less aggressive than their ancestors.
  • Domestic Hairy Deer -- A domesticated form of a hybrid between a mule deer and a white-tailed deer. They are more bold, less timid, and less aggressive than their ancestors. Very commonly used as free-roaming animals and garden animals.
  • Domestic Fallow Deer -- A domesticated form of fallow deer. They are more bold, less timid, and less aggressive than modern fallow deer.. It is commonly used as free-roaming animals and garden animals.
  • Domestic Addax -- A descendant of addaxes that were domesticated for meat, skin, and horns. They are also common as free-roaming animals.
  • Domestic Eland -- Descended from elands that were domesticated for their meat, milk, horns, and skin. They are also very common as free-roaming animals.
  • Domestic Scimitar Oryx -- Descended from scimitar oryx that were domesticated for their meat, horns, and skin. They are also very common as free-roaming animals.
  • Domestic Water Buffalo -- A very common food source, mounts, and free-roaming animals.
  • Domestic Yak -- A large bovid that is related to cows. Commonly used as mount animals, wool source, and free-roaming animals.
  • Domestic Musk Ox -- Descended from wild musk ox that were domesticated. They are common as a source of wool and free-roaming animals.
  • Domestic Bison -- Descended from bison that were domesticated. They are commonly used as food source, mounts, and free-roaming animals.
  • Domestic Cattle -- A very common worldwide food source and free-roaming animals.
  • Domestic Pig -- A very common worldwide food source, free-roaming animals, and pets. Many pig breeds still exist, but there are now more pig breeds, with some resembling peccaries, warthogs, wild boars, red river hogs, or babirusas.
  • Domestic Goat -- A very common worldwide food source and free-roaming animals.
  • Domestic Diprotodon -- Descended from prehistoric Diprotodon that were domesticated for their meat and milk. They are similar to their wild ancestors. They are also common as free-roaming animals.
  • Domestic Zygomaturus -- Descended from prehistoric Zygomaturus that were domesticated for their meat and milk. They are similar to their wild ancestors. They are also common as free-roaming animals.
  • Domestic Nototherium -- Descended from a prehistoric Nototherium that were domesticated for their meat and milk. They are similar to their wild ancestors. They are also common as free-roaming animals.
  • Domestic Sugar Glider -- Descended from sugar gliders that were kept as pets because many people find them cute. They are more bold, less timid, and less bothersome than their ancestors. They are most commonly used as free-roaming animals, garden animals, and pets.
  • Domestic Wallaby -- Descended from wallabies that were domesticated because they were very interesting. They are common as free-roaming animals, garden animals, laboratory animals, and pets.
  • Domestic Serval -- Descended from servals that were domesticated because they were fasionable. They are common as free-roaming animals and pets.
  • Domestic Sheep -- A common source of wool (along with alpacas) and free-roaming animals.
  • Domesticated Asian Elephant -- In the Mid-Holocene, tamed Asian elephants were favored as domestic/farm animals. Domestic Asian elephants will still be similar to modern Asian elephants, but will be bred to be more tame, more bold, less timid, and far less aggressive (even less likely for males to get aggressive, even with high amount of testosterone). They are very common free-roaming animals and mounts. They are the largest domesticated animals ever, about 7.7 tons, 12 ft tall, and 26.4 ft long. They are very similar to their ancestors.
  • Domestic Chalicothere -- Descended from prehistoric Ancylotherium that were domesticated by humans. They are common food source, free-roaming animals, and mount animals.
  • Domestic Tapir -- Descended from mountain tapirs that were domesticated. They are more bold and less timid than their ancestors. They are most commonly used as free-roaming animals, garden animals, food source, and pets. They require grass and fruit to keep them healthy.
  • Domestic Hedgehog -- By the Late Holocene, hedgehogs were favored as common household pets. They are common as garden animals, free-roaming animals, and pets.
  • Domesticated Raccoon Dog -- There were too many of them in zoos, so these basal canids were domesticated. The domesticated variety, Nyctereutes procyonoides domesticus, looks similar to true foxes of the tribe Vulpini.
  • Domestic Skunk -- In the Late Holocene, skunks were favored as pets. Unlike their wild ancestors, they no longer have a bad smell as they were genetically altered to devolve a spraying ability. They are very common garden animals and household pets.
  • Domestic Bobcat -- Domesticated because there were too many of them in zoos and because of their shy and friendly nature. Their coat ranges from brown color with black spots (like their wild ancestors), tabby color, black color, white color, black & white color, grey color, and sand color.
  • Domestic Fur Bear -- Descendant of Asian/American black bear hybrids. Very common as free-roaming animals and pets.
  • Domestic Sun Bear -- Descended from sun bears that were domesticated. Very common as free-roaming animals and pets.
  • Domestic Sloth Bear -- Descended from sloth bears that were domesticated. Very common as free-roaming animals and pets.
  • Domestic Fennec Fox -- A small fox originally native to Africa. Due to it's anatomy it was found to be attractive by humans. It's coat ranges from tannish-orange to all white.
  • Domestic Cat -- A small Felid, that was domesticated thousands of years ago. It is the second carnivora domesticated by humans.
  • Domestic Fruit Bat -- Descended from many species of megabats (including flying foxes, hammerhead bats, and other kinds of fruit bats) that were favored as pets. They are also very common as free-roaming animals, laboratory animals, and garden animals.
  • Domestic Vampire Bat -- Descended from the common vampire bats that were domesticated by humans. They no longer carry rabies or other deadly diseases due to genetic engineering that made their immune systems stronger, so they are now safe to touch, even if they drink blood of larger animals and beings. They became very popular pets due to their portrayal in Dracula films and other vampire movies. They are very common as free-roaming animals, garden animals, laboratory animals, and pets.
  • Domestic Bee - Descended from domesticated group of bees. Unlike modern bees, they no longer have stingers, due to genetic engineering, to keep both bees and humans safe, because of this, they are no longer dangerous. They are very common as food source (honey), free-roaming animals, and garden animals.
  • Domestic Goldfish -- One of the few domesticated fish. Common as free-roaming freshwater fish, garden fish, and pets.
  • Domestic Koi -- A large domesticated form of carp. It is a very ancient domesticated fish. It is very common as free-roaming fish, garden fish, and pets.
  • Siamese Fighting Fish -- A domesticated form of a betta fish. Very common as free-roaming freshwater fish, garden fish, and pets.
  • Guppy -- A very popular domesticated fish. It is very common as free-roaming freshwater fish, garden fish, and pets.
  • GloFish -- In the Mid-Holocene, man has made glowing fishes through genetic engineering. It is very common as free-roaming freshwater fish, garden fish, light sources, and pets.
  • Green & Black Harmless Frog -- Descended from green & black poison dart frogs that completely lost its toxicity and are now harmless, hence their name. They are common as free-roaming animals, garden animals, and pets.
  • Domestic Axolotle -- By the late 21st century, axolotles were favored as pets. They need a regulated temperature in their aquariums.
  • Domestic Beelzebufo -- Descended vrom prehistoric beelzebufos that were domesticated by humans. They were bred to be more tame, more bold, less timid, and less bothersome than their ancestors. There are more than 1,255 breeds of domestic beelzebufos, ranging from African bullfrog size critters to beachball-sized animals. They are very common as free-roaming animals, garden animals, laboratory animals, and pets.
  • Red Eared Slider -- A very popular pet turtle. Also very common as free-roaming animals and garden animals.
  • Domestic Monitor Lizard -- By the late 21st century, goannas were favoured as pets. They need a regulated temperature in their cages.
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