FANDOM


Laaras are a family of herbivorous mammals belonging to the order Perissodactyla, the order that includes horses, rhinoceroses, tapirs, and chalicotheres (including mesorons. Superficially, they look rather like rhinos, although they are actually more closely related to horses; Equidae and Brontotheriidae make up the suborder Hippomorpha. They first evolved in 56 million years ago as small tapir-like mammals, but over time, they evolved into much larger and more rhino-like mammals. They are currently indigenous to North America, but in the Eocene they once existed in Eurasia.

Fork-horned laara

Megacerops forked-horned laara

Fork-horned laara

Fork-horned laara (Megacerops coloradensis) is a species of laara that is indigenous to most of North America, except in taiga reigns or tundra reigns and are the most common species of laaras. However, they were introduced to Africa by accident due to zoo escapees. They are mixed feeders that feed on any kind of plants, including grass, leaves, shrubs, fruits, vegetables, roots, tubers, bulbs, ferns, cycads, and horsetails. They are also the largest known species of laara, about the same size as an African forest elephant, standing up to about 2.5 meters (8 feet 2 inches) tall at the shoulders and the body, including the head, measuring about 5 meter (16 ft) in length. Hence their names, they possess Y-shaped horn-like protrusion on their nose, with blunt ends. They also weigh more than 3 tons when fully grown.

Shovel-horned laara

Embolotherium shovel-horned laara

Shovel-horned laara

Shovel-horned laara (Embolotherium eragsii) is a species of laara that is indigenous to western Mexico and western United States, but were accidentally introduced to Africa due to zoo escapees. They are mostly grazers that feed on grasses, flowers, and ferns, but can also feed on fruits, vines, shrubs, and twigs. They are about 8 feet tall at the shoulders and about 13.7 feet in length. They also weigh about 2,000 kg (4,400 lb), not as large as the fork-horned laara, but is almost as large. The ancestor of shovel-horned laaras (known as Embulotherium andrewsi) once lived in Asia, but eventually they migrated to North America due a landbridge forming between Asia and North America during the Late Eocene period, while the Asian populations of Embolotheriums became extinct while the North American populations of Embolotheriums have survived and evolved into a new species of Embolotherium known as Embolotherium eragsii.
Community content is available under CC-BY-SA unless otherwise noted.