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Hawaii is a large archipelago, where many birds and reptile species diversify and flourish. Hawaii has also grown bigger than today (due to both Ice Age and forming of continents), housing more species than modern Hawaii.

Hawaiian Rainforest

A rainforest spreading across all of Hawaii, this beautiful habitat relies on the animals that inhabit it to spread the trees and control weeds. It is almost always humid, but rarely a mild snow will show up. Many birds and reptiles diversified, most mammals that were introduced got smaller due to insular dwarfism. A majority of animals evolved to climb trees. Birds are the most widespread fauna. In the late Holocene, the US gave parts of Hawaii to Japan and China. Many Asian animals were introduced.

Mammals

  • Jungle Deer - A deer evolved from black-tailed deer that were on islands, during the Holocene. They got smaller and eventually devolved antlers. They stand about a meter and a half tall.
  • Hawaiian Dylanus - Descended from introduced feral dylanuses. It is an omnivore. It is similar to its ancestors, but is now bigger, about 8.5 feet tall and 500 pounds due to insular gigantism.
  • Hawaiian Sheep - A descendant of feral sheep that were introduced. They have Devolved horns and are slightly smaller than their ancestors.
  • Hawaiian Goat - Evolved from feral goats that were introduced. Their horns have disappeared as there are no big predators around.
  • Hawaiian Squirrel - Descended from gray squirrels introduced to Hawaii by humans. They are similar to their ancestors, but with reddish-gray fur color (like red squirrels), rather than grayish-brown fur color (unlike grey squirrels).
  • Hawaiian Monkey Rat - Descended from rats that were introduced to Hawaii. They are better at climbing trees than their ancestors, as they evolved prehensile tails and monkey-like feet for climbing. They have a similar niche to South American monkeys.
  • Hawaiian Mouse - Descended from house mice that were introduced to Hawaii. They are similar to their ancestors that were introduced to Hawaii by humans.
  • Hawaiian Dingo - A wild dog, evolved from feral dogs of Hawaii. It resembles an Australian dingo or New Guinea Singing dog. It possess webbing in its paws and is capable of climbing trees.
  • Hawaiian Tree Wallaby - A descendant of brush-tailed rock wallabies introduced during the Holocene. It has evolved convergent to tree kangaroos.
  • Hawaiian Ground Wallaby - A descendant of brush-tailed rock wallabies introduced during the Holocene. It is similar to its ancestors, but is now more suited to lowland forests of Hawaii rather than rocky hills of Australia.
  • Hawaiian Opossum Wallaby - Descended from brush-tailed rock wallabies introduced during the Holocene. It resembles a hybrid between a wallaby and a Virginia opossum, and it has a similar niche and diet to Virginia opossums.
  • Hawaiian Mongoose - A small mongoose, descended from the ones introduced during the Holocene to control rat populations. Its population is controlled by dingoes and Spotted cats.
  • Spotted Cat - A descendant of feral cats, it resembles an Asian leopard cat, and is about the size of a medium-sized dog.
  • Hawaiian Pig - A descendant of feral pigs that resembles a cross between a boar and a peccary. It is about the size of a small llama. Unlike its ancestors, it is no longer an omnivore, it is now completely herbivorous.
  • Hawaiian Monkey - A descendant of African or Asian monkeys that lived in the zoo during the Holocene.
  • Hawaiian Orangutan - Descended from Orangutan that rafted their way across the Pacific Ocean.
  • Hawaiian Dwarves - Small descendants of homo ferus native to Hawaii. They are omnivores. Similar to their ancestors, but are about 3 feet tall.
  • Hawaiian Wood Elves - Descended from wood elves from another universe. They are omnivores. They are similar to their ancestors.
  • Hawaiian Pixies - Descended from pixies that were brought from another universe. They are similar to their ancestors.
  • Hawaiian Fairies - Descended from fairies that were brought from another universe. They are similar to their ancestors.
  • Hawaiian Dogman - Descended from Michigan dogmen that were brought from another universe. They are carnivores. They are similar to their ancestors, but are smaller, about 4 feet tall, due to insular dwarfism.

Birds

  • Apapane - A small red and black bird common amongst Hawaii.
  • Nene - A species of goose endemic to Hawaii.
  • Giant Nene - Deecended from nenes that grew bigger (about the size of an emu), became completely flightless, lost their webbings & their ability to swim, and is much more aggressive (in response to more predators) than any geese alive today. They are herbivores. They resemble a hybrid between a nene and a moa-nalo.
  • Pacific Golden Plover - A long-legged bird found on Hawaii.
  • Duru - A small omnivorous gallus, that feeds on small rodents and plant seed. It resembles a grey-brown tragopan.
  • Yellow-billed Cardinal - A cardinal with a red head and a dark gray and white body.
  • Hawaiian Peacock - A peacock that is red in color, with green, black and blue tail feathers.
  • Hawaiian Moon Macaw - A descendant of a macaw that probably migrated from South America to California, to Hawaii. They are nocturnal.
  • Hawaiian Day Macaw - Descended from Macaws that probably migrate from South America to California, to Hawaii. Unlike moon macaws, they are diurnal.
  • Japanese White-Eye - A bird endemic to Hawaii and Japan.
  • Hawaiian Duck - A Hawaiian subspecies of mallard duck.
  • Hawai'i Elepaio - A small bird found on Hawaiian Islands.
  • Hawaiian Merganser - A burrowing, terrestrial merganser, that is flightless only in some populations.
  • Laysan Finch - A species of Hawaiian honeycreeper, that is endemic to the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands.
  • Sunshine starling - A descendant of the common starling, it evolved to prey on small insects, like ants, termite and bees. It is the faster bird in Hawaii, capable of flying of speeds of 120 miles an hour.
  • Archaeopteryx - Its ancestors escaped from dinosaur parks. It is a carnivore that feeds on insects and sometimes fish. It is similar to its ancestors.
  • Hawaiian Confuciusornis - Descended from confuciusornis that were released by feral dylanuses after humans are mostly gone. They are insectivores. They are similar to their ancestors. Despite competition with modern birds, many species of Mesozoic birds (including confuciusornis) are thriving.
  • Hawaiian Avisaurus - Descended from escaped avisaurus. They are omnivores. They fill the niche similar to that of African hornbills, other than that, they are similar to their ancestors.
  • Hawaiian Enantiornis - Descended from enantiornis that were let loose by feral dylanuses. They are insectivores. They are similar to their ancestors.
  • Hawaiian Sinornis - Descended from sinornis that were let loose by feral dylanuses. They are insectivores. They are similar to their ancestors.
  • Hawaiian Longipteryx - Descended from longipteryx that were let loose by feral dylanuses. They feed on insects and fish. They are similar to their ancestors.
  • Oceania Alexornis - Descended from alexornis that were released by feral dylanuses after humans are mostly gone. They are insectivores. They are similar to their ancestors.
  • Hawaiian Gastornis - Descended from Gastornis that escaped from Cenozoic parks. It is a herbivore. It is similar to its ancestors.
  • Hawaiian Dodo - Descended from dodos that escaped from Cenozoic parks. It was brought back by time travel. It is a bit faster although not much is changed.
  • New Moa-Nalo - Descended from moa-nalos that were brought back through time travel and were reintroduced to Hawaiia by humans. They are herbivores. They are similar to their ancestors, but there are now more species of moa-nalos than there were before their previous extinction in the Early Holocene, about 27 species (rather than just 4 species)
  • Hawaiian Moa - Descended from Moas that escaped from Cenozoic parks. It is a herbivore. It is similar to, but smaller and can reproduce faster than, its ancestors.

Reptiles

  • Hawaiian Giant Tortoise - A descendant of the leopard tortoise, it is a keystone species, responsible for the control of weeds. It's about a meter high and two meters long.
  • Hawaiian Tree Snake - Descended from Brown tree snakes that were introduced to Hawaii in Holocene. They are greener in color and are bigger than their ancestors, about 6 feet long. It's a non-venomous snake, so it captures its prey by constricting its prey like boas, and then killing its prey by biting its prey with its strong jaw.
  • Tree Iguana - A descendant of green iguanas, that probably evolved from iguanas that were introduced there. They evolved a thin-long tail, a slim body, strong limbs and a curved digits on it's fingers.
  • Giant Monitor Lizard - A descendant of monitor lizards introduced to Hawaii. The characteristics of this lizard that it is about the size of a komodo dragon, hence its name.
  • Hawaiian Chameleon - Descended from chameleons that were introduced to Hawaii by people. They feed on small insects.
  • Hawaiiachelys - A meiolanid turtle. Bigger than a saltwater crocodile. Also has a club tail.
  • Hawaiiosaurus - Descended from Dilophosaurus that lives in Hawaii. It is much smaller than its ancestors (about 15 feet long and 230 pounds) and now has a frill to look bigger and poison to paralyze its prey, much like Jurassic park's dilophosaurus. It is the top predator of Hawaii.
  • Microraptor - Descended from Microraptors that escaped from dinosaur parks. It is a carnivore that feeds on insects, smaller reptiles, and small mammals. It is similar to its ancestors.
  • Hawaiian Compsognathus - Descended from Compsognathus that escaped from dinosaur parks. They are carnivores. They are similar to their ancestors.
  • Hesperonychus - Its ancestors escaped from dinosaur parks. They are carnivores. They are similar to their ancestors.
  • Hawaiioraptor - Descended from Eoraptors that escaped from dinosaur parks. They are carnivores. They are similar to their ancestors.
  • Oviraptorids - Descended from Oviraptors that escaped from dinosaur parks. They are omnivores. There are about 198 species of Oviraptorids of Hawaii today. They are similar to their ancestors.
  • Simosuchus - Its ancestors escaped from dinosaur parks. It is a herbivore. It is similar to its ancestors.
  • Kloon - A small flightless moa-like pterosaur. Their ancestors were brought from the New Dinosaurs universe by humans. They are herbivores. They are similar to their ancestors.
  • Wandle - A very large flightless moa-like pterosaur. Their ancestors were brought from the New Dinosaurs universe by humans. They are herbivores. They are similar to their ancestors.
  • Hawaiian Lizardman - Descended from dinosauroids from another universe. They are omnivores. They are similar to their ancestors, but are now only about as intelligent as the orangutan.

Amphibian

  • Cane Toad - Common in Hawaii, a large species of toad.
  • Giant Bulltoad - Descended from cane toads that were introduced to Hawaii by humans. They are similar to the long-extinct beelzebufo frog in size, appearance, locomotion, and niche, feeding on small reptiles, small amphibians, and small mammals.
  • Hawaiian Newt - Descended from salamanders that were introduced to Hawaii by humans.
  • Hawaiian Salamander - Descended from salamanders that were introduced to Hawaii by humans.

Invertebrates

  • Hawaiian Centipede - A descendant of the common house centipede. It is about 1ft in length and has longer legs than the house centipede.
  • Hawaiian Giant Crab - Descended from coconut crabs that were introduced. They are the world's largest terrestrial crabs, about 130 pounds bigger than any of today's terrestrial crab species.

Plants

  • Bitter fruit - Descended from feral pineapple that were grown as a crop for humans. It is extremely larger than it's descendants, about the size of an apple tree. It's fruit is also thinner and softer.

Hawaiian Rivers

A large river in Hawaii.

Mammals

  • Hawaiian River Dolphin - Evolved from bottlenose dolphins that can now tolerate both salt and fresh water. They are similar to the long-extinct baiji river dolphin in appearance, niche, locomotion, and size because of convergent evolution.

​Fish

  • Inland Swordtail- Descended from swordtails that were introduced to Hawaii by humans.
  • Giant Guppy - Descended from guppies that were introduced to Hawaii by humans. They are bigger and more herbivorous than their ancestors.
  • Hawaiian Catfish - Descended from catfishes that were introduced to Hawaii by humans. They are now bigger, about the size of an average size pig, and is more herbivorous than their ancestors.
  • Hawaiian MediumMouth Bass - Descended from a bass fish that were introduced to Hawaii by humans. They are now bigger and more carnivorous than their ancestors.
  • Celestial Koi - Descended from koi fish that were washed out of man-made ponds into Hawaiian rivers. They are bigger than their ancestors, and can live for about 300 years, making it the longest living fish on Earth.
  • Inland Goldfish - Descended from domestic goldfishes that were introduced to Hawaii by humans. They are now bigger and more omnivorous than their ancestors.
  • Gobies - Different species of fish native to Hawaii. Many species of gobies are still alive today.
  • Cichlids - Different species of these fish live in Africa, Asia, North America, and Hawaii. Many species are still alive today.

Reptiles

  • Hawaiian Crocodile - Descended from saltwater crocodiles that escaped from the zoo. They are now bigger than their ancestors.

Hawaiian Shorelines

This is where many seashore animals live.

Mammals

  • Hawaiian Tusked Dolphin - A desendant of rough-toothed dolphin. Two teeth like tusks poke through the bottom jaw.
  • Hawaiian Common Whale - Descended from beluga whales that migrated to Hawaii. They are similar to other beluga whales, but with black on top of its body and white on the bottom.
  • Hawaiian Tusked Whale - Descended from beluga whales that migrated to Hawaiian shorelines. They evolved two tusks, one about 1 ft and the other about three feet long, they are similar to the extinct narwhal relative, Odobenocetops.
  • Humpback whale - A large species of whale. Still alive today.
  • Right Whale - A species of baleen whale. Same species alive today.
  • Bottlenose Dolphin - A species of dolphin. Same species alive today.
  • Rough-Toothed Dolphin - A species of dolphin. Same species alive today.
  • Hawaiian Monk Seal - A species of Monk Seal native to Hawaii.
  • Hawaiian Common Seal - Descended from harbor seals that migrated to Hawaii. It is similar to its ancestors, but is slightly larger, with less fat, and is browner in color than its ancestors.
  • Hawaiian Sea Lion - Descended from sea lions that migrated to Hawaii. They are similar to other sea lion species.
  • Hawaiian Mermaid - Descended from mermaids that were brought from Animal Planet's mermaid documentary universe. They are omnivores. They are similar to their ancestors.

Birds

  • Hawaiian Penguin - Descended from Galapagos penguins that migrated to Hawaii. They are similar to their ancestors.
  • Hawaiian Hesperornis - Descended from Hesperornis that lives on Hawaiian beaches. They feed on fish and squid. They are similar to their ancestors.
  • Hawaiian Ichthyornis - Descended from Ichthyornis that were let loose by feral dylanuses. They feed on fish. They are similar to their ancestors. Despite competition with gull species, Ichthyornis are thriving.

Reptiles

  • Shorerunner - A small pterosaur species of Hawaii. Their ancestors were brought from the New Dinosaurs universe by humans. They behave very much like seagulls. They are omnivores. They are similar to their ancestors.

Invertebrates

  • Coconut Grab - A semi-terrestrial shelled cephalopod. Its ancestors were brought from the New Dinosaurs universe by humans. They have a similar niche to coconut crabs. They are omnivores. They are similar to their ancestors.
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