FANDOM


Gorillas are ground-dwelling, predominantly herbivorous apes that inhabit the forests of central Sub-Saharan Africa, but have since established feral populations across North America.

Eastern Lowland Gorilla

Eastern Lowland Gorilla

A small family of eastern lowland gorillas in a park near Miami.

A large subspecies of eastern gorilla that is critically endangered in its native range in the jungles of Africa, but due to zoo escapees and pet releases in Florida between 1960s and 1990s, they have bred and flourished in the wilderness of Florida ever since. Unlike in their native range, the eastern lowland gorillas in Florida have better tolerance to habitat loss and changing forest environments through both captive breeding and natural breeding, so their populations are increasing throughout southern, southeastern, and southwestern parts of Florida, they even adapted to feed on wider variety of edible plant life than the native ones in Africa, as well as life in cities and suburbs of Florida, they also are serving as backup populations in case the native eastern lowland gorillas in Africa go extinct. Unlike the chimpanzees, which also exists
Eastern Lowland Gorilla range in North America

Distribution map of eastern lowland gorillas in Florida.

in Florida, the eastern lowland gorillas in Florida carries no known annoying or harmful diseases or viruses due to the Florida's eastern lowland gorilla's immune systems that kills off any possible deadly diseases and viruses, making the eastern lowland gorillas safer to touch and interact. Thanks to the strong conservation acts and efforts, it is against the law to kill eastern lowland gorillas in North America, as anyone who kills one will be sentenced to 35-50 years in prison and/or a fine of $1,000,000.

Mountain Gorilla

A species of gorilla that is native to the Albertine Rift montane cloud forests and of the Virunga Volcanoes, ranging in altitude from 2,200–4,300 metres
Mountain Gorilla

A male silverback gorilla of the subspecies, mountain gorilla, near his family in New Orleans, Louisiana.

(7,200–14,100 ft), but have since established non-native feral populations across the eastern, the southeastern, the southern, the southwestern, the western, the northwestern parts of the United States, and the northern humid parts of Mexico (making mountaing gorillas the most common non-sapient non-human ape in North America), where they, by all accounts, are thriving, despite some of the major habitat and temperature differences in some areas. The mountain gorillas in the United States are the results of the failed projects around 1940s and 1990s to keep and breed mountain gorillas in captivity (unlike most other gorilla subspecies, which adapts to captive life over time), and some remaining mountain gorillas escaped and adapted into the North American wilderness, where they have gotten used
Mountain Gorilla range in North America

Distribution map of mountain gorillas in North America.

to the colder temperatures over time, thanks to their fur being thicker than other gorilla subspecies. The mountain gorillas in North America are more adaptable than the ones in native Africa, being able to feed on wider plant types such as mulberry tree leaves, birch tree leaves, pine needles, California'e feral bamboo, and among other native and non-native plants in North America. The mountain gorillas have surprisingly adjusted to life in the cities and suburbs, which is a groundbreaking success for a species endangered in its native range, and the North American mountain gorilla populations serve as backup populations in case the native ones in Africa go extinct. The mountain gorillas in North America is highly resistant to native and non-native diseases and viruses in North America, thanks to their strong immune systems, making the North American mountain gorillas safe to touch. The North American populations of mountain gorillas are more peaceful towards dylanusids and sapient species/beings than in native Africa, even the silverback males of North American mountain gorillas aren't willing to attack any dylanusid or sapient species/beings on sight, as that isn't tolerated in North America. Thanks to the strong conservation acts and efforts, it is against the law to kill mountain gorillas in North America, as anyone who kills one will be sentenced to 35-50 years in prison and/or a fine of $1,000,000.
Community content is available under CC-BY-SA unless otherwise noted.